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I really cannot figure out the syntax necessary for this, and it probably comes from my lack of understanding of how types work.

I want a type DataPoint, which stores either a tuple (x, dataval) or two fields x and dataval (where x is a Double and dataval is a Complex Double.

I want a Monad instance where it goes something like:

instance Monad (DataPoint x dataval) where
    return dataval = DataPoint 0.0 dataval
    DataPoint x dataval >>= f = DataPoint x (f dataval)

Basically, the "value" of the monad is dataval, and x is just a part of the container.

I don't think my syntax is correct though. If i define DataPoint as

data DataPoint x dataval = DataPoint { x       :: Double
                                     , dataval :: Complex Double }

then it should work, right?

Only I get a "kind mismatch"

The first argument of `Monad' should have kind `* -> *',
but `DataPoint x dataval' has kind `*'

Can anyone help me get the functionality/monad I am trying to acheive?

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This datatype cannot be made a monad and it doesn't seem to make sense for it to be one either. What are you trying to accomplish here? –  hammar Apr 29 '13 at 8:10
    
I'm trying to store "dataval", along with an x value associated with it. And then using DataPoint >>= f to apply f to dataval, and leave x unchanged. –  Justin L. Apr 29 '13 at 8:11
    
That sounds more like a plain functor, except they have to support dataval being any type, not just Complex Double. It might make more sense to just define a fmap-like function for your type without involving type classes at all. –  hammar Apr 29 '13 at 8:13
    
how would i go about implementing/instancing that, then? –  Justin L. Apr 29 '13 at 8:14
    
thank you for your advice, i think i have something running :) Do you mind elaborating on how to determine if something should be a functor or a monad? I'm not sure I understand the theoretical difference. –  Justin L. Apr 29 '13 at 8:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In terms of syntax, it's

instance Monad (DataPoint x) where
    -- etc

Although I share hammar's concerns and think you should be trying to make it a Functor instead:

instance Functor (DataPoint x) where
    -- etc

The kind error you get

The first argument of `Monad' should have kind `* -> *',
but `DataPoint x dataval' has kind `*'

is because Monad and Functor are typeclasses that apply to higher order types (compare with Monoid, a typeclass that applies to simple types).

e.g. IO Int is not a monad; IO () is not a monad; IO is a monad.


I want a type DataPoint, which stores either a tuple (x, dataval) or two fields x and dataval (where x is a Double and dataval is a Complex Double.

data DataPoint a = DataPoint {x :: Double,
                              dataval :: a}

instance Functor DataPoint where
    fmap f dataPoint = DataPoint {x = x dataPoint,
                                  dataval = f (dataval dataPoint)}
share|improve this answer
    
am i defining my data/type correctly? –  Justin L. Apr 29 '13 at 8:22
    
Thanks, I think I have it running :) Do you mind elaborating on the differences between functors and monads? I'm trying to figure it out still. –  Justin L. Apr 29 '13 at 8:27
2  
Functors and Monads are different typeclasses. Read the first few chapters of the Typeclassopedia if you've not done so yet. –  dave4420 Apr 29 '13 at 8:30
    
thanks for the reference :) –  Justin L. Apr 29 '13 at 8:37
    
Thank you @ИльяРезвов for the edit. Everyone else: this is why you should use {-# LANGUAGE DeriveFunctor #-} and deriving Functor: it reduces the amount of code you can make silly mistakes in. –  dave4420 Apr 29 '13 at 17:21

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