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I am using sprintf for string formation in C.

I need to insert '+' and '-' sign before float value.

This positive and negative signs are inserted by checking a flag after that i insert the float value.

Now i want to make this whole number in right alignment along with positive or negative sign.

Currently this is my formatted string:

+300.00
-200.00
+34.60

I want output like following,

+300.00
+233.45
 -20.34

I have written following code:

char printbuff[1000], flag = 1;
double temp=23.34, temp1= 340.45;   

sprintf(printBuff, "%c%-lf\n%c%-lf",
        (Flag == 1) ? '+' : '-',
        temp,
        (Flag == 1) ? '+'  :'-',
        temp1);

I am getting following output:

+23.34
+340.45

Instead of the desired:

 +23.45
+340.45

How can I do this?

share|improve this question
4  
Whathaveyoutried.com? –  Anish Ramaswamy Apr 29 '13 at 8:22
1  
You've tagged two languages: do you want a C answer, or a C++ one? –  Angew Apr 29 '13 at 8:23
    
I want C answer. –  Parthiv Shah Apr 29 '13 at 8:25
    
DarkCthulhu : No %-nf is not working. –  Parthiv Shah Apr 29 '13 at 8:29

4 Answers 4

use like this

sprintf(outputstr, "%+7.2f", double_number);

E.g.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>

void output_string(char output_buffer[], double nums[], size_t size){
/*  use '+' flag version
    int i,len=0;
    for(i=0;i<size;++i)
        len += sprintf(output_buffer + len, "%+7.2f\n", nums[i]);
*/  //handmade version
    int i, len=0;
    for(i=0;i<size;++i){
        char sign = nums[i] < 0 ? '-' : '+';
        char *signp;
        double temp = abs(nums[i]);

        len += sprintf(signp = output_buffer + len, "%7.2f\n", temp);
        signp[strcspn(signp, "0123456789")-1] = sign;//The width including the sign is secured
    }
}

int main(){
    double nums[] = {
        +300.00,
        -200.00,
         +34.60,
        +300.00,
        +233.45,
         -20.34
    };
    char output_buffer[1024];
    int size = sizeof(nums)/sizeof(*nums);

    output_string(output_buffer, nums, size);
    printf("%s", output_buffer);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
you have seen the space BEFORE the sign? –  Peter Miehle Apr 29 '13 at 8:34
    
@PeterMiehle It is right-justified without specifying when width is secured sufficiently large. –  BLUEPIXY Apr 29 '13 at 8:36
    
note: '-' flag is left-justified. –  BLUEPIXY Apr 29 '13 at 8:48
    
his signdness is not coded into the float value, but flagged. –  Peter Miehle Apr 29 '13 at 10:27
    
@PeterMiehle don't need his flag (Flag). –  BLUEPIXY Apr 29 '13 at 10:41
int main()
{
char s[100];
double x=-100.00;

sprintf(s,"%s%f",x<0?"":"+",x);
printf("\n%s",s);
x = 1000.01;
sprintf(s,"%s%f",x<0?"":"+",x);
printf("\n%s",s);
return 0;
}

Here is the code. Its O/p is ::

-100.000000
+1000.010000
share|improve this answer
1  
-1 for the spoonfeed. –  Anish Ramaswamy Apr 29 '13 at 8:35
    
@AnishRam Why negative comment...He asked this so i provided the solution –  anshul garg Apr 29 '13 at 8:39
    
Because spoonfeeding isn't going to help the OP. Why don't you just provide hints to the solution instead? Clearly the OP has put in very little effort into solving this problem. –  Anish Ramaswamy Apr 29 '13 at 8:43
    
ok Thanks , i will take care from next time. –  anshul garg Apr 29 '13 at 8:47
1  
For x = -0.0, you will get "+-0.000000", and for x = 0.0/-0.0, you can get "+-nan". The simple x < 0 check fails on edge-cases. –  Daniel Fischer Apr 29 '13 at 9:27

you need a separate buffer, in which you sprintf your number with your sign, and that resulting string you can sprintf into the rightjustified resultbuffer.

share|improve this answer

You need something like:

char str[1000];
double v = 3.1415926;
sprintf(str, "%+6.2f", v); 

The + indicates "show sign".

A more complete bit of code:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    double a[] = { 0, 3.1415, 333.7, -312.2, 87.8712121, -1000.0 };
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0]); i++)
    {
        printf("%+8.2f\n", a[i]);
    }

    return 0;
}

Output:

   +0.00
   +3.14
 +333.70
 -312.20
  +87.87
-1000.00

Obviously, using sprintf, there would be a buffer involved, but I believe this shows the solution more easily.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm curious as to why this was down-voted... Is it something about "standard doesn't support + and - at the same time - it certainly works with glibc. –  Mats Petersson Apr 29 '13 at 8:50
    
'-' flag is left-justified. –  BLUEPIXY Apr 29 '13 at 8:54
    
Gah! Can you tell it's been a while since I used printf? –  Mats Petersson Apr 29 '13 at 8:57
    
I have no idea why this was downvoted, but I've added a piece of code that shows how this works. –  Mats Petersson Apr 29 '13 at 10:54
    
I am inserting + or - sign. –  Parthiv Shah Apr 29 '13 at 12:59

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