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I'm trying to do a matrix multiplication of two vectors in numpy which would result in an array.

Example

In [108]: b = array([[1],[2],[3],[4]])
In [109]: a =array([1,2,3])
In [111]: b.shape
Out[111]: (4, 1)
In [112]: a.shape
Out[112]: (3,)
In [113]: b.dot(a)
ValueError: objects are not aligned

As can be seen from the shapes, the array a isn't actually a matrix. The catch is to define a like this.

In [114]: a =array([[1,2,3]])    
In [115]: a.shape
Out[115]: (1, 3)    
In [116]: b.dot(a)
Out[116]: 
array([[ 1,  2,  3],
       [ 2,  4,  6],
       [ 3,  6,  9],
       [ 4,  8, 12]])

How to achieve the same result when acquiring the vectors as fields or columns of a matrix?

In [137]: mat = array([[ 1,  2,  3],
       [ 2,  4,  6],
       [ 3,  6,  9],
       [ 4,  8, 12]])

In [138]: x = mat[:,0]      #[1,2,3,4]
In [139]: y = mat[0,:]      #[1,2,3]
In [140]: x.dot(y)
ValueError: objects are not aligned
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are computing the outer product of two vectors. You can use the function numpy.outer for this:

In [18]: a 
Out[18]: array([1, 2, 3])

In [19]: b
Out[19]: array([10, 20, 30, 40])

In [20]: numpy.outer(b, a)
Out[20]: 
array([[ 10,  20,  30],
       [ 20,  40,  60],
       [ 30,  60,  90],
       [ 40,  80, 120]])
share|improve this answer

Use 2d arrays instead of 1d vectors and broadcasting with the * ...

In [8]: #your code from above

In [9]: y = mat[0:1,:]

In [10]: y
Out[10]: array([[1, 2, 3]])

In [11]: x = mat[:,0:1]

In [12]: x
Out[12]: 
array([[1],
       [2],
       [3],
       [4]])

In [13]: x*y
Out[13]: 
array([[ 1,  2,  3],
       [ 2,  4,  6],
       [ 3,  6,  9],
       [ 4,  8, 12]])
share|improve this answer
    
x.dot(y) and x * y both work in this case, the trick is to use slices so that both x and y are 2d arrays. –  Bi Rico Apr 29 '13 at 19:27

It's the similar catch as in the basic example.

Both x and y aren't perceived as matrices but as single dimensional arrays.

In [143]: x.shape
Out[143]: (4,)

In [144]: y.shape
Out[144]: (3,)

We have to add the second dimension to them, which will be 1.

In [171]: x = array([x]).transpose()
In [172]: x.shape
Out[172]: (4, 1)
In [173]: y = array([y])
In [174]: y.shape
Out[174]: (1, 3)
In [175]: x.dot(y)
Out[175]: 
array([[ 1,  2,  3],
       [ 2,  4,  6],
       [ 3,  6,  9],
       [ 4,  8, 12]])
share|improve this answer
    
Instead of x = array([x]).transpose(), you can just do x.reshape(-1,1) or x[...,np.newaxis], neither of which creates a new array. –  askewchan Apr 30 '13 at 15:14

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