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My table has thousands of rows classified by 400 classes, and a dozen columns.

The ideal outcome will be a table with 400 rows (1 row for each class) based on the max value of column "z", and containing all the original columns.

Here is an example of my data, and I need only the 2nd, 4th, 7th, 8th rows extracted in this example, using R.

     x           y         z    cluster 
1  712521.75  3637426.49  19.46   12 
2  712520.69  3637426.47  19.66   12  *
3  712518.88  3637426.63  17.37   225
4  712518.4   3637426.48  19.42   225 *
5  712517.11  3637426.51  18.81   225
6  712515.7   3637426.58  17.8    17 
7  712514.68  3637426.55  18.16   17  *
8  712513.58  3637426.55  18.23   50  *
9  712512.1   3637426.62  17.24   50
10 712513.93  3637426.88  18.08   50 

I have tried many different combinations including these:

  tapply(data$z, data$cluster, max)       # returns only the max value and cluster columns
  which.max(data$z)         # returns only the index of the max value in the entire table

I have also read through the plyr package, but did not find a solution.

Thank you in advance!!!

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Chinmay Patil, A Handcart And Mohair, Ricardo Saporta, mnel, Wolph Apr 30 '13 at 12:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

A very straightforward way is to use aggregate and merge:

> merge(aggregate(z ~ cluster, mydf, max), mydf)
  cluster     z        x       y
1      12 19.66 712520.7 3637426
2      17 18.16 712514.7 3637427
3     225 19.42 712518.4 3637426
4      50 18.23 712513.6 3637427

You can even use the output of your tapply code to get what you need. Just make it into a data.frame instead of a named vector.

> merge(mydf, data.frame(z = with(mydf, tapply(z, cluster, max))))
      z        x       y cluster
1 18.16 712514.7 3637427      17
2 18.23 712513.6 3637427      50
3 19.42 712518.4 3637426     225
4 19.66 712520.7 3637426      12

For several more options, see the answers at this question.

share|improve this answer
    
Just a warning: make sure you use stats::aggregate and not raster::aggregate. (Ditto for merge). Under normal circumstances this is unlikely to be a problem; but it might fool you one day :-) – Carl Witthoft Apr 29 '13 at 13:05
    
Thank you very much for the help, aggregate() and merge() worked perfect. The second example using tapply() did not work in my case, and produces an unseasonably large table. It is good to mention that aggregate() does not keep duplicate values and merge does, – Inga Apr 29 '13 at 18:01
    
@Inga, I don't totally understand your comment here, but my instinct says that you may want to read the help file for merge for how to control it better. In particular, the by argument (which specifies which columns to use as the columns to match against from each dataset) should be of use here to control the duplicate values. Good luck, and welcome to Stack Overflow! – A Handcart And Mohair Apr 29 '13 at 18:35
    
Thank you Ananda! I tried to use the 'by', 'by.x' and 'by.y' but neither removed the duplicates. This is a good thing in my case since these values are just on the same z plane, and have different x,y. I also read the documentation on 'aggregate()' and it does not mention how duplicate are handled, that's why I wanted to point it out. – Inga Apr 29 '13 at 22:50
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thank you all for the help! aggregate() and merge() worked perfectly for me.

An important point: aggregate() - selected only one of the duplicate points per cluster but, merge() - selected all duplicate points, since they had same max values in one cluster.

This is ideal in this case since the these points are 3D, and are not duplicates when considering x and y coordinates.

Here is my solution:

df        <- read.table("data.txt", header=TRUE, sep=",")
attach(df)
names(df)
[1] "Row"         "x"           "y"           "z"           "cluster"
head(df)
  Row        x       y     z     cluster
1   1 712521.8 3637426 19.46         361
2   2 712520.7 3637426 19.66         361
3   3 712518.9 3637427 17.37         147
4   4 712518.4 3637426 19.42         147
5   5 712517.1 3637427 18.81         147
6   6 712515.7 3637427 17.80          42


new_table_a     <- aggregate(z ~ cluster, df, max)  # output 400 rows, no duplicates
new_table_b     <- merge(new_table_a, df)          # output 408 rows, includes duplicates of "z"

head(new_table_b)
      cluster     z  Row        x       y
1           1 20.44 6043 712416.2 3637478
2          10 26.09 1138 712458.4 3637511
3         100 19.39 6496 712423.4 3637485
4         101 25.74 2141 712521.2 3637488
5         102 17.33 2320 712508.2 3637484
6         103 21.01 6908 712462.2 3637493
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