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The tipp to use the CD environment variable from batch scripts to get the current working directory is commonly posted. But CD won't get updated when calling another batch file. Then the cd command echoes the new path of the other batch file, but %CD% (or !CD!) is not updated. Example:

@echo off
 cd %~dp0
 echo in %0: CD=%CD%
 pause
 call X:\testcall.cmd

Save this as C:\testcall.cmd and X:\testcall.cmd, then run C:\testcall.cmd. You should see that the value of CD has not changed. This seems not to dependend on call; none of the following works:

start /D <NEW_DIR> <OTHER_CMD_FILE>
start cmd /c <NEW_DIR>\<OTHER_CMD_FILE>
cmd /c <NEW_DIR>\<OTHER_CMD_FILE>
<NEW_DIR>\<OTHER_CMD_FILE>
cd %~dp0
pushd %~dp0

CD will keep it's old value, while cd (the command) shows the correct directory. Therefore I set CD at the begin of a script:

set CD=%~dp0

...while assuming cmd.exe sets CD only if this variable is yet unset. True?

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Where do you echo the %CD% in the caller batch or in the called batch? –  jeb Apr 29 '13 at 16:39
    
If you explicitly set CD with set CD=... you can't access the pseudo variable CD anymore –  jeb May 7 '13 at 10:11
    
You shouldn't save your example as c:\testcall.cmd AND X:\testcall.cmd, as X:\testcall.cmd will end up in an endless loop –  jeb May 8 '13 at 9:50
    
Your expection of the result is wrong, the result itself is quite correct –  jeb May 8 '13 at 10:00
    
The endless loop is prevented by pause. This is just minimal test script... –  Andreas Spindler May 8 '13 at 10:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I build two batch files from your comment

test1.bat - located in C:\temp

@echo off
cd %~dp0
echo File %~f CD=%CD%
call X:\test2.bat

test2.bat - located in *X:*

@echo off
cd %~dp0
echo File %~f CD=%CD%

Starting test1 it from C:\temp, the output is

File C:\temp\test1.bat CD=C:\temp 
File X:\test2.bat CD=C:\temp

The result is absolutly correct!

Starting a batch file (or any other program) with an absolute or relative path doesn't change the current directory.

The CD seems to fail, as CD can't change the drive the way you used it.

You need to add a switch CD /d %~dp0

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Not mixing... maybe my short example was incomplete. As I wrote in the initial question a cd %~dp0, pushd or start /D does not update CD either. You can test this by putting a cd %~dp0 on top of the test script. The only way to get the true working directory seems to be calling cd on top of the script, and set CD explicitly. But this looks like a hack - therefore this thread. –  Andreas Spindler May 8 '13 at 10:00
    
Ok, but now it becomes clear. CD will not change your directory without /D switch –  jeb May 8 '13 at 10:18
    
Interesting... only cd /D really updates CD. I tested it by calling a script on different drives, and another directory on the same drive. Only cd /D updates CD in both cases. Obviously this was intended by Microsoft: by adding /D they did not want to break the existing behavior of setting CD only if yet unset. So this is the solution. –  Andreas Spindler May 8 '13 at 11:19

Diagnosis

You have at some point set the CD variable explicitly. If you do this it will no longer automatically reflect the current working directory. To undo this, set it to empty:

set CD=

It will then begin working again.

Why is this? Well, the automatic CD variable was introduced as a feature. I assume they just didn't want to break pre-existing scripts which already used that varible name. So if you set it explicitly, CMD will assume you are doing so on purpose.

Discussion

Firstly, if the parent process has an explicitly set CD variable, it will be inherited by the child processes.

On the other hand, you shouldn't expect any of these to update the value of %CD% for the parent process:

start /D <NEW_DIR> <OTHER_CMD_FILE>
start cmd /c <NEW_DIR>\<OTHER_CMD_FILE>
cmd /c <NEW_DIR>\<OTHER_CMD_FILE>

These all create new processes, the new process then changes its own working directory. You should not expect this to affect the parent process.

The final one, does not update the working directory at all, unless OTHER_CMD_FILE executes a CD command:

<NEW_DIR>\<OTHER_CMD_FILE>

Just because you executed a script in a different directory does not mean that the script's working directory will change. The script working directory does not have to be set to the location of the script.

Advice

Relying on the working directory being set to anything in particular is generally a bad idea.

You probably want something like this:

SET SCRIPT_DIR=%~dp0

Then use (for example) "%SCRIPT_DIR%\config.txt" to refer to a file in that directory.

Alternatively if you wish to rely on the current directory, use cd /d %~dp0

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CD was not set explicitly. When set by cmd initially it will also stick at its value. The key probably is what you said: CD was never truely implemented by M$. Therefore set CD=%~dp0 seems to be the solution, as CD is a standard variable, and I find it to complicate, generally, to introduce another variable for the same thing. When you see variables like SCRIPT_DIR in a (bigger) script you always wonder how and where it is set; for CD the meaning is inherent. –  Andreas Spindler Apr 29 '13 at 12:44
    
@AndreasSpindler, You seem to think that the WORKING directory and the SCRIPT directory are the same thing - they are not the same thing at all. If %CD% doesn't reflect the current WORKING directory, it means that it has been set explicitly, either by the current script, or by another script which has run previously, or by the calling process. Also, CD and SCRIPT_DIR (or %~dp0) do not mean the same thing. SCRIPT_DIR or %~dp0 would be the location of the script file. CD is the current working directory, which may not be the same. –  Ben Apr 29 '13 at 13:25
    
@AndreasSpindler: Setting the value of CD variable is a very bad idea. Think for a moment what would happen if someone tries to set the value of DATE or TIME variables. And the answer to your thought is: YES, all these variables are of the same type! –  Aacini Apr 29 '13 at 16:04
    
+1, good advice. But be aware if you run a batch file from a UNC path name (\\myserver\myshare\myfile.bat), then cd /d %~dp0 won't work. Instead use pushd which will create a temporary drive letter for UNC paths. –  Joe Apr 29 '13 at 17:13
    
@Aacine: Setting DATE would be bad; but isn't it actually a bug NOT to update CD? If you see the use of CD in the code, wouldn't you expect it to return the current working directory? At least the out-of-the-box-behavior is not comprehensible; it can be dangerous to rely on CD when branching back and forth between batch files. –  Andreas Spindler May 6 '13 at 16:07

%CD% is the current directory, while %~dp0 is the directory of the currently-running script (with trailing '\').

Also, don't set an env. var called CD, since it will override the default %CD% pseudo-var, and will be incredibly confusing - see OldNewThing - ERRORLEVEL is not %ERRORLEVEL%.

For example, when running c:\temp\a.cmd, which is:

@echo off
echo Currently running script: %~dpnx0
cd %~dp0
echo scriptDir=%~dp0, CD=%CD%
cd %~dp0a
echo scriptDir=%~dp0, CD=%CD%
set CD=bogus value
echo scriptDir=%~dp0, CD=%CD%

output:

Currently running script: c:\temp\a.cmd
scriptDir=c:\temp\, CD=c:\temp
scriptDir=c:\temp\, CD=c:\temp\a
scriptDir=c:\temp\, CD=bogus value
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You can set the %cd% variable to whatever you want, the real current directory for the C: drive is stored in the %=c:% variable, and you can't change this with the set command:

@echo off
echo Currently running script: %~dpnx0
cd %~dp0
echo scriptDir=%~dp0, CD=%CD%
set CD=bogus value
echo scriptDir=%~dp0, CD=%CD%, =c:=%=c:%
set =c:=bogus value
echo scriptDir=%~dp0, CD=%CD%, =c:=%=c:%

Output is:

Currently running script: C:\OldDir\a.bat
scriptDir=C:\OldDir\, CD=bogus value
scriptDir=C:\OldDir\, CD=bogus value, =c:=C:\OldDir
syntax error.
scriptDir=C:\OldDir\, CD=bogus value, =c:=C:\OldDir

The =C: variable for a child process is always set from the parent process. If you avoid the setlocal command in your script OR choose endlocal, you can change persistend the current directory for the current cmd session:

C:\OldDir>type script.bat
cd c:\newdir

C:\OldDir>script

C:\OldDir>cd c:\newdir

C:\NewDir>

.

C:\OldDir>type script.bat
setlocal
cd c:\newdir

C:\OldDir>script

C:\OldDir>setlocal

C:\OldDir>cd c:\newdir

C:\OldDir>
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2  
%=c: doesn't contain the real current directory, it contains only the current directory for drive C: and %=d:% contains the current dir of drive D:. So you don't know which is the real current drive –  jeb Apr 29 '13 at 16:36
    
Yes, you are completely right. Edited my answer. Every volume has it's own "current directory". Its impossible to rename the %=X: directory, if it is set. It is set on the first access of a volume. –  Endoro Apr 29 '13 at 17:10

Using the script-directory %~dp0 can be a solution, but usually isn't. This works better:

cd >tmpfile
set /P CD= <tmpfile
del tmpfile

This solution is consistent with the CD variable. CD contains the current directory, not ending in a slash character if it is not in the root directory of the current drive. The path printed by cd behaves exactly so.

I'm using this for years and had no problems setting CD explicitly. Later I began using PWD (as in Bash). This variable is not reserved in MSDOS. So my question here was actually: "Can we get rid of these lines, or is this some MSDOS idiom?"

Some have written that setting CD explicitly is bad. Why? MSODS was never properly designed, and is not further developed. Anything you can do with it is legal. There is no bad MSDOS programming - just good and bad hacks. I know no other language where this perspective is legal to such an extent.

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This isn't necessary, the CD variable contains always the correct directory. Sometimes you can't access it via %CD% in blocks, but that's not a problem of CD itself. –  jeb May 7 '13 at 8:45
    
Have you really read this thread? It is not updated properly if you call batch scripts back and forth. –  Andreas Spindler May 7 '13 at 9:08
1  
Please show an example with one or two batch files where it fails. I can't reproduce your problem –  jeb May 7 '13 at 10:09
    
Thanks for asking for some concrete code; you're right (+1). Simple call a batch file on another drive, like @echo off & echo in %0: CD=%CD% & pause & call X:\testcall.cmd. Save this code as C:\testcall.cmd and X:\testcall.cmd (but these are just two arbitary drives). When running C:\testcall.cmd you should see that the value of CD remains the same. Tested on Windows 7, Version 6.1.7601. –  Andreas Spindler May 8 '13 at 8:37
    
@AndreasSpindler, tested on Window 7, Version 6.1 build 7601. Value of %CD% remained the same, i.e. in c:\testcall.cmd: CD=C:` and in Z:\testcall.cmd: CD=C:`. I believe you have at some point set it explicitly, causing it to no longer reflect the current working directory. –  Ben Jul 10 '13 at 12:44

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