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I want to know more about usage of property attributes described here: http://www.ecma-international.org/ecma-262/5.1/#sec-8.6.1

I can imagine usecases of these attributes, but they are very rare. In addition writable, enumerable and configurable properties are set to false by default, but mostly I want to have these values true, so I have to set them. Why are they false by default?

Make object and set its attributes was very basic thing for me. Now there is property descriptor, which I could describe like artificial, unnatural, complicated or uncomfortable. Maybe I just missed something very essential.

So my questions are: What is main purpose of property attributes. How can we use them?

Can I avoid using property descriptor? For example with some good pattern that will set attributes for me? For example if I use Object.create with second param "Properties", it forces me to use property descriptor. So should I avoid to use this?

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"Can I avoid property descriptors" - of course, there's nothing that forces you to use them. Just do old-school property assignment. –  Bergi Apr 29 '13 at 12:14
    
I don't know why they made the default false, but I'd guess it's because there's already a way to make properties with a default of true. What's your actual concern? If you want some custom behavior WRT the defaults, just create a function that sets the defaults however you want. –  squint Apr 29 '13 at 12:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

"...mostly I want to have these values true, so I have to set them."

Only if you have a need for them. If you don't, then just use the typical object literal syntax, or the assignment operator for new properties.

"Why are they false by default?"

I would imagine it's because there's already a syntax available that defaults them to true.

"Make object and set its attributes was very basic thing for me. Now there is property descriptor..."

Nothing has changed. It's just as basic as it was before. There are simply more tools at your disposal if you need them.

"...which I could describe like artificial, unnatural, complicated or uncomfortable."

The syntax is perhaps a little cumbersome, but if you don't like it, don't use it. If you need to set the property descriptors to something other than true, then I would think you'd be glad to have the new capabilities, irrespective of its syntax.

Also, there's likely property descriptor definition being added to object literal syntax in ECMAScript 6.

"So my questions are: What is main purpose of property attributes. How can we use them?"

That should be self-explanatory. They're for manually configuring the configurable, writeable, and enumerable settings of properties on an object. If you ever come across a situation where you need one of those settings, you'll use them.

"Can I avoid using property descriptor?"

Of course. Again, nothing has changed. They're there if you need them. If you don't, then ignore them.

"For example with some good pattern that will set attributes for me?"

Not sure what you mean, but if you want different defaults, just use a helper function, like:

function addWriteable(obj, prop, value) {
    return Object.defineProperty(obj, prop, {
        writeable: true
    });
}
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The default for writeable is false only if

If the value of an attribute is not explicitly specified by this specification for a named property

For properties you define by hand it will be true for example. The thing you should be aware of that there is a huge difference between ecmascript itself without any specification on top of it and the javascript/jscript dialects.

Either way, in general you should never do anything with these attribute properties, except if you're considering making a framework or anything along those lines. For example, prototype.js could use it to set Enumerable to false and I used it myself to redefine the Get to allow a bit of an exotic syntax which was easier for developers to use (similar to a different native syntax), but whilst doing normal stuff you don't need it.

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Object.create with two parameters call defineProperties which force me to use property descriptor. So does your answer implie that I should avoid using "properties" parameter declaration in this function? Because otherwise I think I should understand things that I am setting. –  Entity Black Apr 29 '13 at 12:49
    
Indeed, don't set anything if you don't need to. –  David Mulder Apr 29 '13 at 12:54

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