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I get the following error with the code below.

expected constructor, destructor, or type conversion before '=' token

--

#include <string>
#include <map>

class Foo {

};

std::map<std::string, Foo> map;
map["bar"] = Foo();

int main()
{

    return 0;
}
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2  
Your problem isn't "instantiating at global level", it's "trying to execute a statement at global level". You just can't do that, sorry. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 26 '09 at 23:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted
map["bar"] = Foo(); // This line is a statement not a declaration.
                    // You have to put it in main, or any execution context


Untill C++0x becomes mainstream, I would suggest using boost. Filling the map becomes piece of cake. Here is an example:

std::map<std::string, Foo> mymap;
...
int main()
{
  insert(mymap)
   ("First",  Foo(...))
   ("Second", Foo(...))
   ("Third",  Foo(...));
   ...
}
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Short answer, as you've seen, is: you can't do that.

I think what you really want is this:

std::map<std::string, Foo> map;

int main()
{
    map["bar"] = Foo();

If you really need the initialization to execute before main() you will often see examples like this:

namespace {
   struct StaticInitHelper {
       StaticInitHelper() { map["bar"] = Foo(); }
   } _helper_obj;
}

However, now you have a new problem which is that there's no guarantee that map is created before _helper_obj. One way around this is to combine them:

namespace {
   struct StaticInitHelper : public std::map<std::string, Foo> {
       StaticInitHelper() { (*this)["bar"] = Foo(); }
   } map;
}

Inheriting from STL container classes is generally not recommended, however. Note that this example hides any other constructors and the STL base class does not have a virtual destructor. This would be considered a "hack" by many, and should really be avoided.

Yet another alternative is to define the class with a std::map:

namespace {
   struct StaticInitHelper {
       StaticInitHelper() { map["bar"] = Foo(); }
       std::map<std::string, Foo> map;
   } map_holder;
}

map_holder.map.find(...

But of course this complicates any use of the map.

Update:

I forgot to mention another option, using boost::assign:

#include <boost/assign/list_of.hpp>

map<int,int> map = boost::assign::map_list_of(1,2)(2,3)(3,4)(4,5)(5,6);

I can't find information on whether that's safe on a static object, though.

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It looks like what you want is a static initializer. I suggest you read this. Its illustrative of the use of static initializers and also of their primary pitfall, static initialization order.

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2  
Why the downvotes? At least leave a constructive comment. –  Tim Sylvester Oct 26 '09 at 23:40
    
I didn't downvote you, but I think I see why yours isn't a good answer. It doesn't address the question. Static initialization and the ordering dangers may be part of an answer to his question but you didn't include that. –  Zan Lynx Oct 27 '09 at 0:56
    
There is no such thing as a static initializer in c++. Globals are initialized by there constructors. Also the linked article is terrible and full of really bad advice. –  Loki Astari Oct 27 '09 at 6:43
2  
Well, far be it from me to contradict someone with such a high rating (and a grammatical error in their comment), but I call bullshit. The C++ faqs is a respected site which has spawned a respected book. No, technically there isn't a 'static initializer' in C++ but there is a 'construct on first use' idiom which accomplishes the same thing, and if the OP is trying to initialize a global map with values, then this idiom is likely to be useful to him. –  Jherico Oct 27 '09 at 16:48

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