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I have the following SQL statement:

select  cast (count(*) as bigint) from 
(SELECT  oldtable.id,oldtable.day,newtable.newid from oldtable
left outer join newtable on oldtable.day between newtable.FROM_DAY 
and newtable.TO_DAY and oldtable.id = newtable.id) a

this results 4.5 billion

but when I say this:

INSERT  INTO AnotherTable
(id, day, newid)
SELECT  oldtable.id,oldtable.day,newtable.newid from oldtable
left outer join newtable on oldtable.day between newtable.FROM_DAY 
and newtable.TO_DAY and oldtable.id = newtable.id

it only inserts 300 million records (oldtable contains 4.5 billion records, newtable 430 million).

Why?

The definiton of AnotherTable:

CREATE MULTISET TABLE AnotherTable ,NO FALLBACK ,
 NO BEFORE JOURNAL,
 NO AFTER JOURNAL,
 CHECKSUM = DEFAULT,
 DEFAULT MERGEBLOCKRATIO
 (  
  id INTEGER NOT NULL,
  day DATE FORMAT 'YYYY-MM-DD',  
   newid INTEGER NOT NULL
 )
 PRIMARY INDEX ( id) 
 PARTITION BY RANGE_N(day  BETWEEN DATE '2000-09-20' AND DATE '2030-02-15' EACH INTERVAL '1' DAY );

I made the following checking:

 SELECT oldtable.id,oldtable.day,newtable.newid from oldtable 
 left outer join newtable on oldtable.day between newtable.FROM_DAY and newtable.TO_DAY
 and oldtable.id = newtable.id 
 where newtable.newid is null 

It resulted 0 records, so outer join is not needed at all, I just use it here to demonstrate that the record number is different, but it shouldn't be

share|improve this question
    
Is it possible that you have a not-NULL constraint on newid? This might be NULL due to the left outer join. –  Gordon Linoff Apr 29 '13 at 13:01
    
I made the following checking: SELECT oldtable.id,oldtable.day,newtable.newid from oldtable left outer join newtable on oldtable.day between newtable.FROM_DAY and newtable.TO_DAY and oldtable.id = newtable.id where newtable.newid is null It resulted 0 records, so outer join is not needed at all, I just use it here to demonstrate that the record number is different, but it shouldn't be –  Kornél Regius Apr 29 '13 at 13:05
    
Are you receiving any error messages from the database server at all? Were there any disk storage limitation issues? If it continues to fail, perhaps try generating insert statements from your SQL select, and then running the insert scripts afterward. –  Shan Plourde Apr 29 '13 at 13:16
    
No error messages. Disk Storage set to be more than enough. –  Kornél Regius Apr 29 '13 at 13:37
    
Can you post the table definition for AnotherTable? I have a hunch but would like to see the table definition first. (Actually post all table definitions if you can.) –  Rob Paller Apr 29 '13 at 14:46
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Where did you get the number of inserts from?

4.5 billion minus 300 million is approx. 4.2 billion.

When you exactly calculate the number of missing rows is the result 4.294.967.296?

Then it might be due to "Warning: 6813 Numeric overflow in internal counters."

Cut&Paste from the Messages manual:

6813 Numeric overflow in internal counters. The number of rows returned is actual number of rows returned, modulo 2^32. Explanation: This warning message is sent within SUCCESS/OK parcel when the activitycount (i.e., the number of rows) returned, overflows the current max limit of (2^32 - 1). The request is successful. The value returned to the user is : (actual number of rows returned) modulo 2^32.

NOTE: If the user knows that the actual number of rows returned cannot exceed 2^33, then the actual number of rows returned can be derived as follows: actual number of rows returned = 2^32 + the value returned to the user.

Dieter

share|improve this answer
    
I am no longer working at the company so I cannot check, but this seems to be the best reason –  Kornél Regius Jun 28 '13 at 20:54
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