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I am trying to run a simulation to test the average Levenshtein distance between random binary strings.

My program is in python but I am using this C extension. The function that is relevant and takes most of the time computes the Levenshtein distance between two strings and is this.

lev_edit_distance(size_t len1, const lev_byte *string1,
                  size_t len2, const lev_byte *string2,
                  int xcost)
{
  size_t i;
  size_t *row;  /* we only need to keep one row of costs */
  size_t *end;
  size_t half;

  /* strip common prefix */
  while (len1 > 0 && len2 > 0 && *string1 == *string2) {
    len1--;
    len2--;
    string1++;
    string2++;
  }

  /* strip common suffix */
  while (len1 > 0 && len2 > 0 && string1[len1-1] == string2[len2-1]) {
    len1--;
    len2--;
  }

  /* catch trivial cases */
  if (len1 == 0)
    return len2;
  if (len2 == 0)
    return len1;

  /* make the inner cycle (i.e. string2) the longer one */
  if (len1 > len2) {
    size_t nx = len1;
    const lev_byte *sx = string1;
    len1 = len2;
    len2 = nx;
    string1 = string2;
    string2 = sx;
  }
  /* check len1 == 1 separately */
  if (len1 == 1) {
    if (xcost)
      return len2 + 1 - 2*(memchr(string2, *string1, len2) != NULL);
    else
      return len2 - (memchr(string2, *string1, len2) != NULL);
  }
  len1++;
  len2++;
  half = len1 >> 1;
  /* initalize first row */
  row = (size_t*)malloc(len2*sizeof(size_t));
  if (!row)
    return (size_t)(-1);
  end = row + len2 - 1;
  for (i = 0; i < len2 - (xcost ? 0 : half); i++)
    row[i] = i;

  /* go through the matrix and compute the costs.  yes, this is an extremely
   * obfuscated version, but also extremely memory-conservative and relatively
   * fast.  */
  if (xcost) {
    for (i = 1; i < len1; i++) {
      size_t *p = row + 1;
      const lev_byte char1 = string1[i - 1];
      const lev_byte *char2p = string2;
      size_t D = i;
      size_t x = i;
      while (p <= end) {
        if (char1 == *(char2p++))
          x = --D;
        else
          x++;
        D = *p;
        D++;
        if (x > D)
          x = D;
        *(p++) = x;
      }
    }
  }
  else {
    /* in this case we don't have to scan two corner triangles (of size len1/2)
     * in the matrix because no best path can go throught them. note this
     * breaks when len1 == len2 == 2 so the memchr() special case above is
     * necessary */
    row[0] = len1 - half - 1;
    for (i = 1; i < len1; i++) {
      size_t *p;
      const lev_byte char1 = string1[i - 1];
      const lev_byte *char2p;
      size_t D, x;
      /* skip the upper triangle */
      if (i >= len1 - half) {
        size_t offset = i - (len1 - half);
        size_t c3;

        char2p = string2 + offset;
        p = row + offset;
        c3 = *(p++) + (char1 != *(char2p++));
        x = *p;
        x++;
        D = x;
        if (x > c3)
          x = c3;
        *(p++) = x;
      }
      else {
        p = row + 1;
        char2p = string2;
        D = x = i;
      }
      /* skip the lower triangle */
      if (i <= half + 1)
        end = row + len2 + i - half - 2;
      /* main */
      while (p <= end) {
        size_t c3 = --D + (char1 != *(char2p++));
        x++;
        if (x > c3)
          x = c3;
        D = *p;
        D++;
        if (x > D)
          x = D;
        *(p++) = x;
      }
      /* lower triangle sentinel */
      if (i <= half) {
        size_t c3 = --D + (char1 != *char2p);
        x++;
        if (x > c3)
          x = c3;
        *p = x;
      }
    }
  }

  i = *end;
  free(row);
  return i;
}

Can this be sped up?

I will be running the code in 32 bit ubuntu on an AMD FX(tm)-8350 Eight-Core Processor.

Here is the python code that calls it.

from Levenshtein import distance
import random
for i in xrange(16):
    sum = 0
    for j in xrange(1000):
        str1 = bin(random.getrandbits(2**i))[2:].zfill(2**i)
        str2 = bin(random.getrandbits(2**i))[2:].zfill(2**i)
        sum += distance(str1,str2)
    print i,sum/(1000*2**i)
share|improve this question
1  
Have you profiled your whole program and this function to determine where the cpu cycles are being spent? If not, you're just guessing. –  sizzzzlerz Apr 29 '13 at 13:15
    
@sizzzzlerz I profiled the whole program to find it spends most of its time in this function. I don't know how to profile the function itself at any finer level of detail. –  marshall Apr 29 '13 at 14:13
    
@sizzzzlerz I just reran the profiling. On a short run it takes roughly 17 seconds in this function and the next most expensive function takes 0.055 seconds. –  marshall Apr 29 '13 at 14:27
    
str1 = bin(random.getrandbits(2**i))[2:].zfill(2**i) <- that creates a string of 2**i 1s and 0s, right? The computation of the distance is O(len1 * len2), for i = 15 that does take a while. –  Daniel Fischer Apr 30 '13 at 0:34
    
@DanielFischer Yes. If the distance computation could be sped up by clever C optimisations/use of SSE etc. that would be really wonderful. –  marshall Apr 30 '13 at 5:48

4 Answers 4

You could run this parallel maybe. Generate one giant list of randoms at the start, then in your loop, spawn threads (8 threads) at a time to each process one chunk of the list and add its final result to the sum variable. Or generate a list of 8 at once and do 8 at a time.

The problem with the openmp suggestion is "This algorithm parallelizes poorly, due to a large number of data dependencies" - Wikipedia

from threading import Thread

sum = 0

def calc_distance(offset) :
    sum += distance(randoms[offset][0], randoms[offset][1]) #use whatever addressing scheme is best

threads = []
for i in xrange(8) :
    t = new Thread(target=calc_distance, args=(i))
    t.start()
    threads.append(t)

later....

for t in threads :
     t.join()

i think this method would port nicely to opencl later as well if levenshtein distance kernel was available (or codable).

This is just a quick post from memory so there are probably some kinks to work out.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I hear multiprocessing is the recommended module these days for python parallel processing. Does threading have some advantages? –  marshall May 13 '13 at 21:27
    
Multiprocessing uses processes instead of threads. Many people prefer multiprocessing due to pythons global interpreter lock in threaded code. You could try both and compare them they have a similar syntax using the "Process" class. Multiprocessing may actually have a slight advantage here <docs.python.org/2/library/multiprocessing.html>; –  beiller May 14 '13 at 12:55

What you could do is start by learning some OpenMP concepts and directives from this site: A beginner's Primer to OpenMP

You need a compiler that is OpenMP compatible. Here is a list of compilers that work. You will want to use the -fopenmp option when compiling your code.

I've only added the compiler directive #pragma omp parallel for to your code to tell the compiler that the following blocks of code can be run in parallel. You could see addition gains in performance by changing your while loops to for loops, or by applying the OpenMP pattern throughout this function. You can tune the performance by adjusting the number of threads that are used to execute the for loops by using the function omp_set_num_threads() before these blocks. A good number for you to start with is 8 since you will be running on an 8-core processor.

lev_edit_distance(size_t len1, const lev_byte *string1,
              size_t len2, const lev_byte *string2,
              int xcost)
{
  size_t i;
  size_t *row;  /* we only need to keep one row of costs */
  size_t *end;
  size_t half;

 // Set the number of threads the OpenMP framework will use to parallelize the for loops
 omp_set_num_threads(8);

  /* strip common prefix */
  while (len1 > 0 && len2 > 0 && *string1 == *string2) {
    len1--;
    len2--;
    string1++;
    string2++;
  }

  /* strip common suffix */
  while (len1 > 0 && len2 > 0 && string1[len1-1] == string2[len2-1]) {
    len1--;
    len2--;
  }

  /* catch trivial cases */
  if (len1 == 0)
    return len2;
  if (len2 == 0)
    return len1;

  /* make the inner cycle (i.e. string2) the longer one */
  if (len1 > len2) {
    size_t nx = len1;
    const lev_byte *sx = string1;
    len1 = len2;
    len2 = nx;
    string1 = string2;
    string2 = sx;
  }
  /* check len1 == 1 separately */
  if (len1 == 1) {
    if (xcost)
      return len2 + 1 - 2*(memchr(string2, *string1, len2) != NULL);
    else
      return len2 - (memchr(string2, *string1, len2) != NULL);
  }
  len1++;
  len2++;
  half = len1 >> 1;
  /* initalize first row */
  row = (size_t*)malloc(len2*sizeof(size_t));
  if (!row)
    return (size_t)(-1);
  end = row + len2 - 1;

  #pragma omp parallel for
  for (i = 0; i < len2 - (xcost ? 0 : half); i++)
    row[i] = i;

  /* go through the matrix and compute the costs.  yes, this is an extremely
   * obfuscated version, but also extremely memory-conservative and relatively
   * fast.  */
  if (xcost) {
   #pragma omp parallel for
   for (i = 1; i < len1; i++) {
      size_t *p = row + 1;
      const lev_byte char1 = string1[i - 1];
      const lev_byte *char2p = string2;
      size_t D = i;
      size_t x = i;
      while (p <= end) {
        if (char1 == *(char2p++))
          x = --D;
        else
          x++;
        D = *p;
        D++;
        if (x > D)
          x = D;
        *(p++) = x;
      }
    }
  }
  else {
    /* in this case we don't have to scan two corner triangles (of size len1/2)
     * in the matrix because no best path can go throught them. note this
     * breaks when len1 == len2 == 2 so the memchr() special case above is
     * necessary */
    row[0] = len1 - half - 1;
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for (i = 1; i < len1; i++) {
      size_t *p;
      const lev_byte char1 = string1[i - 1];
      const lev_byte *char2p;
      size_t D, x;
      /* skip the upper triangle */
      if (i >= len1 - half) {
        size_t offset = i - (len1 - half);
        size_t c3;

        char2p = string2 + offset;
        p = row + offset;
        c3 = *(p++) + (char1 != *(char2p++));
        x = *p;
        x++;
        D = x;
        if (x > c3)
          x = c3;
        *(p++) = x;
      }
      else {
        p = row + 1;
        char2p = string2;
        D = x = i;
      }
      /* skip the lower triangle */
      if (i <= half + 1)
        end = row + len2 + i - half - 2;
      /* main */
      while (p <= end) {
        size_t c3 = --D + (char1 != *(char2p++));
        x++;
        if (x > c3)
          x = c3;
        D = *p;
        D++;
        if (x > D)
          x = D;
        *(p++) = x;
      }
      /* lower triangle sentinel */
       if (i <= half) {
        size_t c3 = --D + (char1 != *char2p);
        x++;
        if (x > c3)
          x = c3;
        *p = x;
      }
    }
  }

  i = *end;
  free(row);
  return i;
}

You can also do reduction operations on variables that are being operated on in your for loops too in order to provide simple parallel calculations like sum, multiply, etc.

Another thing I forgot to mention is that you should probably try calling this function from within a C program, rather than Python. You could make a very simple main() function similar to your Python code.

int main()
{
    int i = 0,
        j = 0,
        sum = 0;
    char str1[30]; // Change size to fit your specifications
    char str2[30];

    #pragma omp parallel for
    for(i=0;i<16;i++)
    {
        sum = 0;
            // Could do a reduction on sum across all threads
        for(j=0;j<1000;j++)
        {
            // Calls will have to be changed
            // I don't know much Python so I'll leave that to the experts 
            str1 = bin(random.getrandbits(2**i))[2:].zfill(2**i)
            str2 = bin(random.getrandbits(2**i))[2:].zfill(2**i)
            sum += distance(str1,str2)
        }
        printf("%d %d",i,(sum/(1000*2*i)));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. I will be running the code in 32 bit ubuntu on an AMD FX(tm)-8350 Eight-Core Processor. The compiler is gcc version 4.7.2. –  marshall May 1 '13 at 18:34
    
I should have said that the python code just sets str1 and str2 to be random binary strings of length 2**i. –  marshall May 3 '13 at 9:00
    
I'm not convinced that this works. Levenshtein distance is not an embarrassingly parallel problem due to its recursive definition. –  larsmans May 8 '13 at 13:06

What I'd do:

1) Very small optimization: allocate once and for all row to avoid memory management overhead. Or you may try realloc(), or you could keep track of row's size in a static variable (and have row static as well). This saves very little, however, even if it costs little to put in place.

2) You are trying to calculate an average. Do the average calculation in C as well. This ought to save something in calls. Again, small change, but it comes cheap.

3) Since you're not interested in the actual calculations but only in the results, then, say you have three PC's and each of them is a quad-core machine. Then run on each of them four instances of the program, with the loop being twelve times shorter. You will get twelve results in one twelfth of the time: average those, and Bob's your uncle.

Option #3 requires no modifications at all except for the cycle, and you may want to make it a command line parameter, so that you can deploy the program on a variable number of computers. Actually, you may want to output both the result and its "weight", to minimize chances of errors when you sum the results together.

for j in xrange(N):
    str1 = bin(random.getrandbits(2**i))[2:].zfill(2**i)
    str2 = bin(random.getrandbits(2**i))[2:].zfill(2**i)
    sum += distance(str1,str2)
print N,i,sum/(N*2**i)

But if you're interested in a generic Levenshtein statistic, I'm not so sure that doing the calculation with only 0 and 1 symbols is suitable to your purpose. From the string 01010101, you get 10101010 either by flipping eight characters or by dropping the first and adding a zero at the end, with two different costs. If you have all the letters of the alphabet, the second possibility becomes much less likely, and this ought to change something in the average cost scenario. Or am I missing something?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I am only interested in binary strings at the moment. –  marshall May 1 '13 at 21:23

Someone else did a great deal of research a year or two ago and did run-time testing as well.

He came up with this and basicly used a solution tree to speed things up.

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