Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am having some problems modifying the content of a smart pointer returned by a class function. Returning a reference to the pointer would be a solution, but I am concerned of it as a bad practice.

This is my code:

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo() : ptr_(new int(5)) {};
    ~Foo() {};

    std::shared_ptr<int> bar()
    {
        return ptr_;
    }

    void print()
    {
        std::cout << *ptr_ << std::endl;
    }

private:
    std::shared_ptr<int> ptr_;
};

int main()
{
    Foo f;
    f.print();

    // First case
    f.bar() = std::make_shared<int>(23);
    f.print();

    // Second case
    f.bar().reset(new int(23));
    f.print();

    // Third case
    *f.bar() = 23;
    f.print();

    return 0;
}

And this is the output:

5
5
5
23

Why only in the third case ptr_ changes its value?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

bar() returns a copy of the shared_ptr.
So assigning to that copy doesn't change the original shared_ptr.

To make it work as you expected, you should have returned a reference to the internal pointer:

std::shared_ptr<int>& bar()
{
   return ptr_;
}
share|improve this answer
    
But I always thought that a pointer points to a memory address. If I am returning a pointer that points to the same memory address every time, why isn't the value changing? –  Puyover Apr 29 '13 at 13:14
1  
@Puyover You are returning a copy. In your case, because you haven't declared a variable, a new temporary variable is created. You are doing and assignment to that new variable, which means it now points at something else. But it's not the same variable that exists in the object. –  Yochai Timmer Apr 29 '13 at 13:17
1  
@Puyover You're not returning a pointer, you're returning a smart pointer with is an object containing a pointer. –  zakinster Apr 29 '13 at 13:17
1  
@OP Because shared_ptr is wrapper for an owning pointer. It is not actually a pointer, but it is a class, which you have made objects of. It contains a pointer, but it is not one. –  miguel.martin Apr 29 '13 at 13:17
    
Ok, I think I understand it now. The syntax of not creating a variable to store the returned pointer was messing me. Thank you all! –  Puyover Apr 29 '13 at 13:20
add comment

Because in the first two cases you only change the returned copy. In the third case you change what the pointer actually points to.

If you want the first two cases to work, return a reference instead.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It's because bar() should return a reference to the shared pointer in order to do what you expect :

 std::shared_ptr<int>& bar()
share|improve this answer
add comment

Because the first two cases are using the assignment operator on a temp returned by bar(), effectively splitting it off from Foo. In the last case, the dereference allows direct mutation on the shared payload.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.