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How to bind a slide event on click in init function? I'm new to plugins development so I need a lit bit help?

I'm coding:

(function( $ ) { 

    var methods = { 

        init: function(){  

            return this.bind('click',methods.slide());

        },

        slide: function() {

            alert('I\'m sliding');

            // and lets the element color turns into green
            return this.css('color','green');            

        }

    };

    $.fn.myPlugin = function( method ) {

        if ( methods[method] ) {

            return methods[method].apply( this, Array.prototype.slice.call( arguments, 1 ));

        } else if ( typeof method === 'object' || !method ) {

            return methods.init.apply( this, arguments );

        } else { 

            $.error( ' Method ' + method + ' doesn\'t exists in jQuery.myPlugin ');

        }

    }

})(jQuery)


$('#test').myPlugin();

<p id="test">Test</p>

I see alert but it's only when it's init on a start, but how to bind an event slide on click?

share|improve this question
    
I'm added a comment to @SpYk3HH answer, still can't mind how to use a methods or params outside. –  Smash Apr 29 '13 at 15:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What's broken in your code:

As far as what's breaking in your code, return $(this).on('click', methods.slide()); doesn't need the () after .slide. You're literally telling it to make that call right away, rather than asigning the function. change it too return $(this).on('click', methods.slide);

ALSO: return this.css('color','green'); should be return $(this).css('color','green');


To better explain jQuery Plugins:

The following is my most basic of jQuery plugin layout templates. From it you can design pretty much any jQuery plugin you want and have a ton of versatility. It's pretty self explanatory. Just look it over and if it helps, great, if not let me know and I'll remove it as an answer.

/*  Example Plug-in Setup   */
(function($) {
    if (!$.myPlugin ) { // your plugin namespace
        $.extend({
            myPlugin : function(elm, command, args) {
                return elm.each(function(index){
                    /*  THIS IS WHERE YOUR HEAVY WORK IS DONE AT    */
                    // do work to each element as its passed through
                    // be sure to use something like
                    //      return elm.each(function(e) { dor work });
                    // as your final statement in order to maintain "chainability"
                });
            }
        });
        $.fn.extend({
            myPlugin : function(command) {
                //  nothing extra needed here. Simply plugin your namespace and account for any parameters you might need. remove the ones you dont.
                return $.myPlugin ($(this), command, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1));
                //  Params Explained: The first Param you "send" here is the jQuery Object of the "Element in Play".
                //      This is the element(s) to which work will be applied.
                //  The Second is like any other jQuery Plugin (like stuff seen in jQueryUI), often it is a "command", thus I named it command,
                //      Though, you might need it as an object, an array, or even undefined! You can make it whatever you want. Treat it
                //      like any other parameter in any other "function/method"
                //  The last Param being passed here is simply an array of ALL other arguments/parameters sent to the funtion, again, change as you need too
            }
        });
        $.myPlugin.props = {    //  This could be used to store "properties" for your plugin, such as "variable timers", etc...
            key1: "value",
            key2: "value"
        };
        $.myPlugin.methods = {  //  Here you might add more "functions/methods" needed to make you plugin work, such as loops, etc...
            key1: function(param) {

            },
            key2: function(param) {

            }
        };
        $.myPlugin.init = function(param) { //  Here I designate a special spot for a special function, Initialize.
                //  You don't have to use this, or any of these extra spots, this is just simply a good practice in my opinion
                //  This keeps a centralized area in your code for what is going on to "start" your plugin
            var key = "value",
                key2 = {
                    subKey: "value"
                };
                /*
                /  run any number of initializing functions here
                /  I prefer to make my param a value that can be a
                /   string with a possible object
                /    the string for holding a base configuration
                /    the object for any change in properties or base values for that config
                */
        };
        $.myPlugin.defaults = { //  Here is a section for possibly "overridable" options.
                //  Simple variables you "need" to make plugin work, but have a "default"
                //      value that can be overriden by a later coder
            key1: "value",
            key2: {
                prop1: {
                    subKey1: "value",
                    subKey2: "value"
                },
                prop2: {
                    subKey1: "value"
                }
            },
            key3: function(param) {

            }
        };
    }
})(jQuery);

Simply use $.extend({ area to build you plugin as if it where a normal area of JavaScript. The fn.extend will add the jquery style mark up for $.myPlugin("element selector", command, args) && $("element selector").myPlugin(command, args). The rest is simply variables for different things you might need keeping a namespace that carries throughout your plugin, so you're not stepping on toes.


Answering a comment: Using one method in another is as easy as using the method. I think what you are missing is how the plugin is fired. You're trying to make use of an old example and your event's are not firing as you expect. This is for multiple reasons, but one of the first things you're missing is the "key" to jQuery. You're missing your chainability. When you call $.fn.extend, you're telling jquery "Hey, I have an element obejct I want you to add properties too, and then give me my object back!" In order to do this in the "easiest" of formats, lets take what you have, and apply it to a "piece" of my plugin and see what's going on.

First, let's make sure you have a namespace for JUST YOUR PLUGIN. This way no other plugin can argue with it, unless it's loaded first. This is a key rule to making "expansive" javascript plguins.

(function($) {
    if (!$.myPlugin ) { // your plugin namespace
        $.extend({
            myPlugin : function(elm, command, args) {

Alright, with our plugin namespace established, we can add our "expected" work.

            myPlugin : function(elm, command, args) {
                //  Here, I'm ensuring the return of the entire "element objecT" passed into this plugin,
                //      in our case `$('#test')`, tho it could be several elements such as `$("input, select, textarea")`
                return elm.each(function(index){
                    //  Here is where we apply work to EACH AND EVERY ELEMENT being sent in.
                    //      Keep in mind, prep work could be done before this,
                    //          for specific variables of data, however, only this
                    //          area affects the elements directly

                    //  The following will "asign" the method `.slide` from our OWN methods to the "click" function  of the element
                    $(this).on("click", function(e) $.myPlugin.methods.slide);
                });
            }
        });

Now we'll add the ability to make "traditional" jQuery Calls on our plugin. Things like $.myPlugin("#test") OR $("#test").myPlugin()

        //  this will simply add the ability to call our plugin via "traditional" jQuery Mark-up
        $.fn.extend({
            myPlugin : function(command) {
                return $.myPlugin ($(this), command, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1));
            }
        });

All that's left now is to create that slide method. Initialize has already been established via the work above, though you could restructure that return each call to "only" be called if "init" is sent as a param, though this leads to alot of "control" issues.

        $.myPlugin.methods = {  //  Here you might add more "functions/methods" needed to make you plugin work, such as loops, etc...
            slide: function(param) {
                alert('I\'m sliding');
                // and lets the element color turns into green
                return $(this).css('color','green');            
            }
        };

Finally, just close it all up!

    }
})(jQuery);

See jsFiddle Here for full working example!

share|improve this answer
    
too difficult for me yet, sorry –  Smash Apr 29 '13 at 13:12
1  
seriously? then you might wanna just work with simple jQuery for now. This is the most basic plugin layout I could possibly think of. The only thing extensive here is the constant use of the name space. That simply makes sure your plugin plays nice with others. –  SpYk3HH Apr 29 '13 at 13:17
    
i'll add some more comments for you, maybe it will help. But this really is very basic. –  SpYk3HH Apr 29 '13 at 13:17
1  
@AviAtion Like This. This uses some of what you were looking at before, but hopefully explains it a litte better. Hopefully you can start to see where things are going. –  SpYk3HH Apr 29 '13 at 15:33
1  
@AviAtion and dont feel too bad. To be honest, I used that EXACT SAME DOC to try to make my first plugin and was CONFUSED AS ALL H311!!! But then I got better at it and developed this. I should probably blog it in full detail, but for now, here it is with plenty of commentary and example. I hope you have a little better luck now. The first plugin is always the hardest. –  SpYk3HH Apr 29 '13 at 15:36

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