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I have the following function that returns a list of distances between the elements of a list of integers:

def dists(l: List[Int]) = {
  //@annotation.tailrec
  def recurse(from: Int, rest: List[Int]): List[Int] = rest match {
    case Nil => Nil
    case to :: tail => to - from :: recurse(to, tail)
  }

  l match {
    case first :: second :: _ => recurse(first, l.tail)
    case _ => Nil
  }
}

The :: prevents me from using the @tailrecannotation although it seems that the call to recurse is in tail position.

Is there a @tailrec compatible way to do the concatenation?

I could use an accumulator but then I would have to inverse the input or the output, right?

Edit: I am especially interested in the recursive approach. My concrete use case is a bit more complicated in that one call to recurse could add several items to the result list:

=> item1 :: item2:: recurse(...)

The distance function is just an example to demonstrate the problem.

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1  
I have found out many times that accumulating and reversing was faster than other alternatives I tried. It always depends on the circumstances but don't be afraid to reverse. –  huynhjl Apr 29 '13 at 14:47
    
I think accumulating + reversing is the way to go for now. Thx! –  2beaucoup Apr 29 '13 at 15:29
    
The usual alternative to accumulating and reversing is the notion of a difference list, where you accumulate a function that would build up the list by appending rather than the list itself. That might not work as well on the JVM, though... –  Myserious Dan Apr 29 '13 at 16:36
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure that you can do what you are trying to do w/o an accumulator variable to ensure proper tail call optimization. I mocked up a redo with an accumulator and a reverse at the end. You could eliminate the reverse at the end by doing append instead of prepend, but I believe the prepend/reverse combo will be more efficient when creating larger lists.

object TailRec {
  def dists(l: List[Int]) = {
    @annotation.tailrec
    def recurse(from: Int, rest: List[Int], acc:List[Int]): List[Int] = rest match {
      case Nil => acc
      case to :: tail => 
        val head = to - from
        recurse(to, tail, head :: acc)
    }

    val result = l match {
      case first :: second :: _ => recurse(first, l.tail, List())
      case _ => Nil
    }
    result.reverse
  }

  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    println(dists(List(1,5,8,14,19,21)))

  }
}

Now, you wanted to, you could just do this dists function with out of the box functionality available on the List like so:

List(1,5,8,14,19,21).sliding(2).filterNot(_.isEmpty).map(list => list.last - list.head)

That might end up less efficient, but is more succinct.

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I thought that scala as an fp lang would offer a more elegant approach than accumulating + reversing for such a basic problem but I'll live with it. Thanks! –  2beaucoup Apr 29 '13 at 15:20
    
I haven't thought through the details here, but whether accumulating and reversing is the "right" solution depends on the algorithm at hand, not the language being used. Well, at least it doesn't depend on the particular language being used, but rather its evaluation strategy. You might approach this very differently in Haskell, for example, since tail recursion in the form that most people think of it is less common there. –  Myserious Dan Apr 29 '13 at 16:27
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This is not a reply to the exact original request, it's an alternative solution to the problem.

You can simply zip the list with the same list "shifted" by one position and then map the resulting zipped list to the difference of the tupled elements.

In code

def dist(l: List[Int]) = l.zip(l drop 1) map { case (a,b) => b - a}

If you have trouble understanding what' s going on I suggest splitting the operation and explore on the REPL

scala> val l = List(1,5,8,14,19,21)
l: List[Int] = List(1, 5, 8, 14, 19, 21)

scala> l zip (l drop 1)
res1: List[(Int, Int)] = List((1,5), (5,8), (8,14), (14,19), (19,21))

scala> res1 map { case (a, b) => b - a }
res2: List[Int] = List(4, 3, 6, 5, 2)
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Thanks for your answer but I was more interested in the recursive approach. My concrete use case is a bit more complicated in that one call to recurse could add several items to the result list: => item1 :: item2:: recurse(...) The distance function was just an example to demonstrate the problem. –  2beaucoup Apr 29 '13 at 15:02
1  
I'd suggest you explicitly add this comment to the original post, lest people incorrectly vote this answer. –  pagoda_5b Apr 29 '13 at 15:17
1  
Also keep in mind that explicit recursion is generally discouraged if you can possibly write it with the high-level operations (since they work on other structures and are probably more optimized than what you'd do). In your case, if you need to emit more than one element per iteration, you can easily switch to flatMap instead of map. –  Myserious Dan Apr 29 '13 at 16:34
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If you want to operate on neighbor elements of a list, sliding is your friend:

def dist(list: List[Int]) = list.sliding(2).collect{case a::b::Nil => b-a}.toList
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Sorry bit late to this, standard pattern that exists in Haskell and ML works also in scala. This is pretty similar to cmbaxter's answer but I thought I'd add it just for reference, something like this would have massively helped me when I began Scala.

Always use an accumulator pattern when recursing through lists. Also I've used the curried form of defining a function here rather than the tupled form.

Also relating to your code, I'd put all pattern match statements inside the recursive function itself rather than have an external val.

  def build (l1: List[Int]) (acc: List[Int]): List[Int] =
l1 match {
    case Nil => acc
    case h::t => build (t) (acc.::(h))
    case _ => acc
}                                                 //> build: (l1: List[Int])(acc: List[Int])List[Int]    
  val list1 = List(0, 1, 2)                       //> list1  : List[Int] = List(0, 1, 2)
  val list2 = List(3, 4, 5, 6)                    //> list2  : List[Int] = List(3, 4, 5, 6)
  val b = build(list1)(list2)                   //> b  : List[Int] = List(6, 5, 4, 3, 0, 1, 2)
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