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I'm familiar with Computer Vision (Well, know OF it), of which one application can be image recognition, such as Optical Character Recognition, I believe. However, something that I am more interested in is 'computer listening', which I have just learned is considered Digital Signal Processing.

The thing that interests me the most about signal processing is the potential application in music. I remember a while ago I saw a preview of an application (Sorry, forgot the name) which could listen to a recording of someone playing a guitar, and automatically graph it out across a time-line with the actual notes/chords that were played. Using the program, the user was able to move these around and even edit them. Now, obviously this is a lot more complicated, but does it involve the same thing? Signal Processing? I am also interested in possible applications in music visualizers and intelligent lighting systems.

My understanding is that doing this processing on a compressed audio format such as MP3 wont yield the same results as MIDI which contains separate tracks (Maybe I misunderstood). Would an uncompressed format such as PCM do better than MP3? I don't know anything about sound processing, that's just what I'm inferring from what I've read so far.

I have already seen this question which has great answers and links that cover a lot of my questions. However, most of the links I've found are theoretical, which I'm sure is all interesting and is definitely worth a read given my interest in the subject, but I wanted to know if there are any existing libraries which can facilitate this, or articles pertaining to this subject that geared towards Computer Science/Programming, with perhaps example code. Even open source sound/music visualizers or any other open source sound processing code would be great.

Sorry if I didn't make any sense. Like I said, I don't know what I'm talking about.

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The thing that interests me the most about signal processing is the potential application in music. I remember a while ago I saw a preview of an application (Sorry, forgot the name)

Maybe cubase ?

which could listen to a recording of someone playing a guitar, and automatically graph it out across a time-line with the actual notes/chords that were played

Deeply simplified, when you play a note you produce a periodic wave with a given frequency. There's a mathematical trick (the Fourier transform DFT) that converts the wave into the spectrum, which instead of presenting intensity against time, it shows it against frequency of the wave. For example, a perfect A note from a tuning fork would produce an oscillating wave at 440 Hz. In the time domain this would appear as a sinusoidal wave. In the frequency domain, it will appear as a single, narrow spike centered at 440 Hz.

Now, when you play a guitar you don't produce perfect sinusoidal waves. Hitting an A will produce the fundamental frequency, 440 Hz, but also a lot of additional frequencies (e.g. 880, on octave higher, but also a lot of other higher and lower freqs), due to the physics of the vibrating string, the material and shape of the guitar etc.. These additional frequencies are called harmonics, and they mix with the fundamental to produce "the sound of the guitar" (what in musical jargon is called timbre). A different instrument (say piano) will have different mixing of harmonics with the fundamental, producing a different timbre.

What DSP programs do is to perform a DFT on the entering signal. With additional tricks, they find the fundamental and the harmonics, and according to what they find they infer the note you played. This must happen fast, because you could find the note while playing live and triggering special tricks. For example, you could hit an A note on the guitar, the DSP understands it's an A and replaces it with the A from a piano, so from the speakers you obtain the sound of a piano.

Using the program, the user was able to move these around and even edit them. Now, obviously this is a lot more complicated, but does it involve the same thing? Signal Processing? I am also interested in possible applications in music visualizers and intelligent lighting systems.

Yes. Once you are in the frequency domain, things gets very easy. For example, you could light up a specific light according to the voice frequencies, and another light with the bass drum.

My understanding is that doing this processing on a compressed audio format such as MP3 wont yield the same results as MIDI which contains separate tracks (Maybe I misunderstood).

They are two different things. MP3 is a compressed format from a sound wave. Basically it takes what pilots the speakers, and compresses it. The idea is the same: DFT, then removal of stuff that is unlikely to be heard (for example, a high pitch that comes right after a high intensity sound is less likely to be heard, so it gets removed).

MIDI on the other hand is a scroll of events (you know, like those pianos in the far west, with the rolling paper scroll). The file contains no music. It contains instead directions for a MIDI player to perform specific notes at specific times with specific instruments. The quality of the "instrument bank" is (among other things) what distinguish a bad MIDI player (which sounds like a child toy) from a good MIDI player (which sounds realistic, in particular for pianos and violins, for wind instruments I still have to hear a realistic one).

It takes that going from MIDI to MP3, you just perform through a MIDI player. To do the other way around is a different story altogether, and much more complex, and here is where DSP comes into play, as you said.

It's like boiling a fisk tank. You get a fish soup. But to get from the fish soup back to the fish tank, it's much harder.

Would an uncompressed format such as PCM do better than MP3?

PCM is a technique to convert an analog signal to a digital signal. So your question has a fundamental misunderstanding, that no PCM format exists (the RAW format is a close call, contaning basically nothing but crude data). If you ask if a uncompressed WAV (which contains PCM data) is better than MP3, then yes, but the question sometimes is how much this better really matters to the human ear, and how much postprocessing you have to perform on that data.

know if there are any existing libraries which can facilitate this, or articles pertaining to this subject that geared towards Computer Science/Programming, with perhaps example code. Even open source sound/music visualizers or any other open source sound processing code would be great.

If you like python, take a look at this page

Sorry if I didn't make any sense. Like I said, I don't know what I'm talking about.

Neither do I, but I toyed a bit with it.

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I think you mean timbre, not timbro – Kirk Broadhurst Oct 27 '09 at 1:18
2  
In italian it's timbro, and musicians use the italian notation quite often. Fixing. – Stefano Borini Oct 27 '09 at 1:20
    
Interesting, thanks. – Kirk Broadhurst Oct 27 '09 at 1:47
1  
+1 for the fish tank/fish soup thing. I'm going to steal that and use it as much as possible. The rest of your answer was also well-written and informative, btw. – mtrw May 12 '10 at 18:25
1  
@Stefano +1 for the fantastic answer (and more if I could...)! You've really cleared up a great deal for me as well! – Diego May 5 '11 at 12:45

My understanding is that doing this processing on a compressed audio format such as MP3 wont yield the same results as MIDI which contains separate tracks (Maybe I misunderstood).

MIDI essentially stores instrument information and musical notes. Also other effects (volume, pitch bend, vibrato, attack rate, etc.)

Not really digital signal processing.

Would an uncompressed format such as PCM do better than MP3?

Maybe somewhat; it depends on the application. MP3 reduces the precision of frequencies that humans are not sensitive to. If you want to do visualisations then MP3 is probably fine.

But if you want to, say, determine what sort of instrument is playing in a recording, then there could be useful information hidden in the frequencies that humans are not sensitive to.

I think The Scientist and Engineer's Guide to Digital Signal Processing is a great reference for programmers. Chapter 8 explains the discrete Fourier transform (used in MP3 processing and a lot of other places to separate out the component frequencies of a wave).

I used it to help make a graphical program that let you draw a wave with the mouse, then applied the DFT, and let you select how many frequencies to include. It was a great exercise.

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I remember a while ago I saw a preview of an application (Sorry, forgot the name) which could listen to a recording of someone playing a guitar, and automatically graph it out across a time-line with the actual notes/chords that were played.

You might also be thinking of Melodyne: http://www.celemony.com/cms/

Though Vari audio in newer version of Cubase is pretty similar. :)

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I think you need to define exactly what you are looking for and what you are trying to do.

If you want to learn about DSP, MIDI or PCM then there is plenty of information on Wikipedia and references.

There are many a myriad of applications for audio manipulation available. What you've described in your question is what takes place in every digital recording studio (which these days would account for almost all studios) every single day.

If you are intending to perform some DSP against, say, a guitar sound then you would ideally have a recording of the guitar itself (rather than a mixed down track containing drums or vocals). It should be quite obviously that you will get better results analysing a discrete signal without additional noise than you will analysing a signal containing significant levels of 'noise'. So yes, a multitrack recording would be preferable to 'an MP3'.

Typical MP3 contains left and right channels (tracks) so it technically is multitrack. When music is recorded (professionally, at least) different signals are recorded onto different tracks, precisely so that they can be edited and processed discretely at a later time.

What, then, do you want to do with the sounds?

As other answers have pointed out, this does not relate to MIDI at all.

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