Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been trying this all day in different variations with little success. Could someone please help explain what I am doing wrong? I am just a beginner with regards to threads.

private JTextArea text = new JTextArea();
private JButton button = new JButton("Cancel");
    public StatusFrame() {
        text.setEditable(false);
        this.add(text);
        this.add(button, BorderLayout.EAST);
        this.setSize(new Dimension(150, 100));
        this.setVisible(true);
    }

    public void updateStatus(String textIn) {
        text.setText(textIn);
    }

    public JButton getButton() {
        return button;
    }

In another class, I am calling methods which may take a while to complete. I want to be able to call the StatusFrame.updateStatus() method to keep the user informed on the progress. This is what I have:

someMethod() {
    // prevent GUI from freezing using threads
    final Runnable r = new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            status = new StatusFrame();
        }
    };
    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(r);

//do something 
    status.update("process 1 completed");
//do something else
    status.updateStatus("Process 2 completed");
}

The frame appears but none of the code after the runnable appears to be run/processed. It just stops/blocks/something. But the GUI remains active

Thanks for any advice.

P.S.: I have tried using invokeAndWait() method but again not sure if I am doing it the right way. For now a quick fix would be preferred as I have not learned much about threads yet. Any instructions are welcome.

share|improve this question
1  
For better help sooner, post an SSCCE. –  Andrew Thompson Apr 29 '13 at 14:25
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have the concepts backwards.

Here's your code

someMethod() {
    // prevent GUI from freezing using threads
    final Runnable r = new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            status = new StatusFrame();
        }
    };
    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(r);

//do something 
    status.update("process 1 completed");
//do something else
    status.updateStatus("Process 2 completed");

You should execute the long running code in a thread, and use the SwingUtilities invokeLater method to update the GUI.

someMethod() {
    // prevent GUI from freezing using threads
    final Runnable r = new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            status = new StatusFrame();
        }
    };
    new Thread(r).start();

// inside the StatusFrame
//do something 
    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            update("process 1 completed");
        }
    );

 //do something else sometime later
    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
             update("Process 2 completed");
        }
    );

I don't know if I was clear in my answer.

  1. Execute SwingUtilities.invokeLater when you start your Java application to make sure Swing components are on the Event Dispatch thread (EDT).
  2. From the EDT, invoke long running processes as a runnable thread.
  3. In the runnable thread, since you're not on the EDT, execute SwingUtilities.invokeLater whenever you're updating Swing components. This ensures that Swing components are updated on the EDT.

Every Swing application should start with a class like this:

import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

import com.ggl.text.entry.model.TextEntryModel;
import com.ggl.text.entry.view.TextEntryFrame;

public class TextEntry implements Runnable {

    @Override
    public void run() {
        new TextEntryFrame(new TextEntryModel());
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new TextEntry());
    }

}

This class does 3 things.

  1. Constructs the GUI data model.
  2. Constructs the GUI JFrame.
  3. Ensures that the Swing components are on the EDT.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks just one question. I am calling invokeeLater() on a runnable created within a thread processing the long running code. The problem is that it appears to finish running the long running code when execute the runnable in the invokeLater(). How can I make it run the runnable passed to the invokeLater() instantly so that it updates the GUI in time. –  Saad Attieh Apr 30 '13 at 15:00
    
You pass an instance of the JFrame class and an instance of the GUI model class in the Runnable's constructor. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Apr 30 '13 at 18:10
    
sorry just saw my question and realised it did not make much sense. What I am trying to ask is: I have a long running code in a threat t1. In the code it makes use of invokeLater() to update the GUI. The problem is that the processes to run within the invokeLater() don't appear to happen until t1 is finished. How can I get the processes that are running in the invokeLater() method i.e. GUI updates, to happen instantly? –  Saad Attieh Apr 30 '13 at 22:25
    
sorry just saw my question and realised it did not make much sense. What I am trying to ask is: I have a long running code in a threat t1. In the code it makes use of invokeLater() to update the GUI. The problem is that the processes to run within the invokeLater() don't appear to happen until t1 is finished. How can I get the processes that are running in the invokeLater() method i.e. GUI updates, to happen instantly? –  Saad Attieh Apr 30 '13 at 22:27
    
You could use the invokeAndWait method, but I'd recommend against it. When you invokeLater, you tell the GUI to update when it can. You also have to make sure that the commands you execute in the invokeLater Runnable do actually update and redraw the GUI. –  Gilbert Le Blanc May 1 '13 at 1:57
add comment

You'll need to call the updates on EDT too. I would suggest to sleep on the main thread, to give GUI a chance to show up before any other work:

someMethod() {
    // prevent GUI from freezing using threads
    Runnable r = new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            status = new StatusFrame();
        }
    };
    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(r);
    try {
        Thread.sleep(10);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
    }

//do something
    r = new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
            status.update("process 1 completed");
        }
    };
    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(r);


//do something else
 r = new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
            status.update("Process 2 completed");
        }
    };
    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(r);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This sleeps on the EDT. –  trashgod Apr 29 '13 at 18:08
    
It will if the thread that called someMethod() is the EDT. –  Jean Waghetti Apr 29 '13 at 18:58
    
Ah, I misread; you meant for someMethod() to be invoked from, and sleep on, some other thread, e.g. the Initial Thread. –  trashgod Apr 29 '13 at 19:03
add comment

See Concurrency in Swing.

You may find using a Swing Worker easier to work with since it uses a Thread and has methods that will allow you to update the GUI properly.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.