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Here is an example of something similar to code I recently wrote, that has proven to be a little contentious at work:

namespace Shape
{
    class Renderer
    {
    public:
        virtual void Draw () = 0;
    };
};

namespace Square
{
    class Renderer : public Shape::Renderer
    {
        virtual void Draw ();
    };
};

namespace Circle
{
    class Renderer : public Shape::Renderer
    {
        virtual void Draw ();
    };
};

The important points are: 1) Within the inheritance hierarchy most classes have the same name but belong to different namespaces 2) 'Renderer' would be just one of several inheritance hierarchies within these same namespaces

My question is: might this ever be a reasonable use of namespaces, or is it an abuse of namespaces? Does anyone else use namespaces in this way?

Having received some comments already, it appears that it may aid the discussion if I point out that in my real-world coding, the namespaces are actually different database technologies, so one is ADO and another is SQLite. Therefore to me the namespaces really are useful groupings.

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Really more appropriate for codereview.stackexchange.com –  Chad Apr 29 '13 at 14:30
    
Thanks @Chad, I wasn't aware of that site. I'll investigate posting the question there instead. –  Coder_Dan Apr 29 '13 at 14:31
2  
Think on whether you might get confused in the future when looking at code that just mentions Renderer... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 29 '13 at 14:34
    
Thanks everyone for posting. I think I've learnt enough already from the comments to say that this is not commonly done, so while it made sense to me, it should be changed to assist with future maintenance. I've also discovered (via Chad) that there is a CodeReview site that might be useful for this kind of question. Thank you for your comments. –  Coder_Dan Apr 29 '13 at 14:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is sufficiently different that you need a really strong justification for why you would want to write your code this way. Your co-workers are just looking at the code going "That's really weird," not "That's really weird, but it's really clever because of X." It's not an abuse, it's just unconventional. But without a sufficiently convincing X-factor, unconventional is bad.

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In my Opinion, this is a misuse of the namespace concept because you spam the global namespace with sub namespaces.

the purpose of namespaces is to logically group functionality without the need of overlong names and the option for handy usage via using clause (ONLY IN CPP - NEVER IN HEADER).

I would invert the nesting:

namespace Renderer
{
  class BasicShape
  {
    //...
  };

  class Circle: public BasicShape
  {};

  class Sqare: public BasicShape
  {};
}
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Thanks @vlad_tepesch. I can see that this works well where you've got only one inheritance hierarchy, or there is not a strong interconnect between the hierarchies. Supposing we had 'Serialiser' too as another hierarchy, I don't think that this works very well because you've got 'Circle' and 'Square' repeated in different namespaces when they are essentially the same thing. –  Coder_Dan Apr 29 '13 at 14:51
    
@Coder_Dan:i think i didn't understood your point with the serializer. why would there repeated Circle's in different namespaces? –  vlad_tepesch Apr 30 '13 at 7:47
    
@vlad_tepesh- it's because I've got multiple inheritance hierarchies within my namespaces, so supposing I added 'Serializer' to this example, you'd then have: namespace Serializer {class BasicShape; class Circle; class Square;} with your inversion of what I did. There is equivalent spamming of the global namespace with this inverted scheme, it's just the other way around, which admittedly keeps the hierarchies within a single namespace, but in my case (where my namespaces are actually different database technologies), your scheme unfortunately does not fit very well. Thanks for replying though –  Coder_Dan Apr 30 '13 at 8:29
    
@Coder_Dan : this sounds to me like another glitch in the design. –  vlad_tepesch Apr 30 '13 at 9:01
    
@Coder_Dan Addendum: the objects that should be serializable should inherit a interface with a pure virtual methods serialize/deserialize. creating a serialization class for each class has some disadvantages: you need to remember (since they are implemented in complete different files) to modify both if you change the class and the more important: how to you determine which class to use if you just have a base pointer? dynamic casts? thats not very pretty. you may also look at boost::serialization –  vlad_tepesch Apr 30 '13 at 9:07

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