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Referring to this post IRepository - Entity implementation I've still some doubt. My entities doesn't implement any primary key, neither anything about property to detect some concurrency exception.

However, that's is behavior I would mantaining. When I test my application, for instance through "in memory reposiotry", I couldn't never get any "ConcurrencyException", nor duplicate key exception. Also, without primay key implementation I cannot execute any Edit(T item) method because I'm not able to retrieve the entity to edit need for.

Should I to implement some interface like "IEntityKey", "IEntityConcurrency" in order to get a real decoupled and testable code?

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I apologize if it can seems a bad question, but really I never have not found any tips abount composite primay key in repository pattern, NEVER. –  bit Apr 29 '13 at 17:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Be careful that you don't try to test your in-memory implementation of your repository. That has no value and is not the purpose of a test. What you usually want to test is your code that uses the repositories, like service and business logic code, controller actions, etc.

That said, you are not forced to have one single mock repository to be used in all your tests. It often makes sense to have different test repositories - or even only fragments of repositories - for different test cases.

For example, if you feel the need to test the behaviour of your application code in case of a concurrency exception, just write a mock repository method like this:

public void Update(T entity)
{
    throw new DbConcurrencyException();
}

Similarly, you can't test all cases where a duplicate key exception might occur when multiple threads, processes or users are involved that act on the same database. To test the behaviour of your application in case of such an exception just throw it explicitly.

If you want to test if a chain of Inserts in your application only uses unique keys then yes, such an interface like IEntityWithKey might help (it could also have two properties for a composite key) and use something like:

public void Add(T entity)
{
    if (InMemoryListOfT.Any(e => e.Key1 == entity.Key1 && e.Key2 == entity.Key2))
        throw new DuplicateKeyException();

    InMemoryListOfT.Add(entity);
}

If in such a possible situation only a specific entity, say Order, is involved I wouldn't even see the need to do this in a generic fashion. For this special test you could also have a repository method like this where you would not need a key interface:

public void Add(T entity)
{
    if (entity is Order)
    {
        var order = entity as Order;
        var inMemoryListOfOrder = InMemoryListOfT as List<Order>;

        if (inMemoryListOfOrder.Any(o => o.OrderId == order.OrderId))
            throw new DuplicateKeyException();
    }
    InMemoryListOfT.Add(entity);
}

Returning data from a repository for a unit test usually belongs to the "Arrange" part of a test. It says: If I return an entity from repository and call this or that method ("Act") I expect the following result ("Assert"). The way how you retrieve the entity is not part of your subject under test. You could just create an entity with new in your test repository's Find method and it doesn't matter if you use a "primary key" for this. If you want to simulate a failing retrieval just return null from your test repository.

No matter how hard you try you won't be able to write an in-memory mock implementation that behaves exactly like Entity Framework and a database will behave in production. This is infrastructure code that you only can fully cover with integration tests that use your really EF provider and your real database system.

You even can't trust your tests about any LINQ queries - whether they are using primary keys or any other property of an entity - because they might work in memory (LINQ-to-Objects) but fail with exceptions when using Entity Framework (LINQ-to-Entities), and if they fail or not might even depend on the EF provider and your database system.

Here is a great detailed answer and lots of examples about the problems you are facing when trying to test Entity Framework queries.

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Ok, but an important question where no-one give in-depth explanation is: should entity classes implement interfaces in order to recognize primary keys and kind of RowVersion? All says "unit of work and repository allow decoupled code and they solve concurrency issue", but I THINK IT IS POSSIBLE only if entity classes implement some interface. Otherwise, how can you think to execute some update or delete method? –  bit Apr 29 '13 at 19:54
1  
@bit: No, the entity don't need to implement interfaces for PKs, etc. The notion of a PK and a row version is an implementation detail of your persistence infrastructure that you can't test with an in-memory test repository. –  Slauma Apr 29 '13 at 20:26
    
Ok, I believe in you. However, now you think to swap from SQL repository to Xml repository without PK, FK and so on. Do you want retrieve an object with "Find(T entity)"? Ok, you can, but it means you should to compare via reflection every entity's public property with all entities inside xml files. It will be very expensive in performance terms. Maybe, If I really want swap to XML data store, I should building a sort of "specification mapper", just like EF, Hibernate and other make up. Something like: "for this entity, this property name is PK, this another one is FK.." Isn't it? –  bit Apr 29 '13 at 20:38
1  
@bit: How you manage identity is still implementation specific. Maybe an interface or a mapper. Swapping SQL for XML seems rather theoretic to me :) you'll be probably encountering bigger problems than the question of a key... –  Slauma Apr 29 '13 at 21:10
    
Ok, thank you so much. –  bit Apr 29 '13 at 21:14

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