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I have this ugly source data with two columns, let's call them EmpID and SomeCode. Generally EmpID maps to the EmployeeListing table. But sometimes, people are entering the Employee IDs in the SomeCode field.

The person previously running this report in Excel 'solved' this problem by performing multiple vlookups with if statements, as well as running some manual checks to ensure results were accurate. As I'm moving these files to Access I am not sure how best to handle this scenario.

Ideally, I'm hoping to tell my queries to do a Left Join on SomeCode if EmpID is null, otherwise Left Join on EmpID

Unfortunately, there's no way for me to force validation or anything of the sort in the source data.

Here's the full SQL query I'm working on:

SELECT DDATransMaster.Fulfillment, 

DDATransMaster.ConfirmationNumber, 
DDATransMaster.PromotionCode,
DDATransMaster.DirectSellerNumber, 
NZ([DDATransMaster]![DirectSellerNumber],[DDATransMaster]![PromotionCode]) AS EmpJoin,
EmployeeLookup.ID AS EmpLookup,

FROM FROM DDATransMaster

LEFT JOIN EmployeeLookup ON NZ([DDATransMaster]![DirectSellerNumber],[DDATransMaster]![PromotionCode])  = EmployeeLookup.[Employee #])
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there is an extra from in your syntax. "FROM FROM DDATransMaster" –  SoftwareCarpenter Apr 29 '13 at 16:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can create a query like this:

SELECT
    IIf(EmpID Is Null, SomeCode, EmpID) AS join_field,
    field2,
    etc
FROM YourTable

Or if the query will always be used within an Access session, Nz is more concise.

SELECT
    Nz(EmpID, SomeCode) AS join_field,
    field2,
    etc
FROM YourTable

When you join that query to your other table, the Access query designer can represent the join between join_field and some matching field in the other table. If you were to attempt the IIf or Nz as part of the join's ON clause, the query designer can't display the join correctly in Design View --- it could still work, but may not be as convenient if you're new to Access SQL.

See whether this SQL gives you what you want.

SELECT
    dda.Fulfillment, 
    dda.ConfirmationNumber, 
    dda.PromotionCode,
    dda.DirectSellerNumber, 
    NZ(dda.DirectSellerNumber,dda.PromotionCode) AS EmpJoin,
    el.ID AS EmpLookup
FROM
    DDATransMaster AS dda
    LEFT JOIN EmployeeLookup AS el
    ON NZ(dda.DirectSellerNumber,dda.PromotionCode) = el.[Employee #])

But I would use the Nz part in a subquery.

SELECT
    sub.Fulfillment, 
    sub.ConfirmationNumber, 
    sub.PromotionCode,
    sub.DirectSellerNumber, 
    sub.EmpJoin,
    el.ID AS EmpLookup
FROM
    (
        SELECT
            Fulfillment, 
            ConfirmationNumber, 
            PromotionCode,
            DirectSellerNumber, 
            NZ(DirectSellerNumber,PromotionCode) AS EmpJoin
        FROM DDATransMaster
    ) AS sub
    LEFT JOIN EmployeeLookup AS el
    ON sub.EmpJoin = el.[Employee #])
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I am able to use NZ to create a new column in my query, but when trying to use the same expression as part of the join I get an error: Join expression not supported. This is the expression I am using in both for the column and for the ON statement nz([Master]![EmpID],[Master]![SomeCode]) AS EmpJoin –  multiphrenic Apr 29 '13 at 16:30
    
I was trying to steer you away from using the function in the join because it's harder to get it correct that way. If you still want to go that route, I'll guess: ON Nz([Master].[EmpID], [Master].[SomeCode]) = EmployeeListing.EmpID Don't include the alias, AS EmpJoin, in the join's ON clause. It might help to show us the full SQL from the query you're working on. –  HansUp Apr 29 '13 at 16:42
    
I've added the query as an edit above, hopefully you can spot something. If not, I can just create a temporary query with the nz column as an expression, and join them in a different query though it would be nice to avoid that. –  multiphrenic Apr 29 '13 at 16:48
    
I am still getting the error. I've moved the nz expression down the chain so to speak to an earlier query, and can now perform the JOIN on a later query. Seems to work that way, thanks for your help! –  multiphrenic Apr 29 '13 at 17:01
    
I also added a subquery version, which is friendlier in the query designer's Design View. –  HansUp Apr 29 '13 at 17:02

What about:

LEFT JOIN EmployeeListing ON NZ(EmpID, SomeCode)

as your join, nz() uses the second parameter if the first is null, I'm not 100% sure this sort of join works in access. Worth 20 seconds to try though.

Hope it works.

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You Could use a Union:

SELECT DDATransMaster.Fulfillment, 
DDATransMaster.ConfirmationNumber, 
DDATransMaster.PromotionCode,
DDATransMaster.DirectSellerNumber, 
EmployeeLookup.ID AS EmpLookup
FROM DDATransMaster
LEFT JOIN EmployeeLookup ON 
DDATransMaster.DirectSellerNumber = EmployeeLookup.[Employee #]
where DDATransMaster.DirectSellerNumber IS NOT NULL

Union

SELECT DDATransMaster.Fulfillment, 
DDATransMaster.ConfirmationNumber, 
DDATransMaster.PromotionCode,
DDATransMaster.DirectSellerNumber, 
EmployeeLookup.ID AS EmpLookup
FROM DDATransMaster
LEFT JOIN EmployeeLookup ON 
DDATransMaster.PromotionCode = EmployeeLookup.[Employee #]
where DDATransMaster.DirectSellerNumber IS NULL;
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