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|  id  |        name        |              date           |     points   |
|  10  |        Paul        |     2013-04-29 10:15:03     |       2      |
|  11  |       Joseph       |     2013-04-29 10:50:17     |       0      |
|  12  |       Joseph       |     2013-04-29 11:23:18     |       10     |
|  13  |        Bill        |     2013-04-29 11:27:10     |       8      |
|  14  |        Paul        |     2013-04-29 11:41:38     |       5      |
|  15  |       Joseph       |     2013-04-29 11:43:15     |       0      |
|  16  |       Joseph       |     2013-04-29 11:47:30     |       0      |
|  17  |       Joseph       |     2013-04-29 12:51:38     |       0      |
|  18  |       Joseph       |     2013-04-29 12:53:58     |       10     |
|  19  |        Bill        |     2013-04-29 13:17:10     |       8      |
|  20  |       Joseph       |     2013-04-29 13:21:38     |       7      |

Only the registers 16 and 17 must be deleted.

What I need is that every time there is a sequence of 0 from the same user, all of the same sequence are deleted, except the first 0, in this case, id number 15.

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marked as duplicate by Ted Hopp, Barmar, Kate Gregory, drwelden, DBD Apr 29 '13 at 19:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Are the ids always incremental? –  Strawberry Apr 29 '13 at 16:42

1 Answer 1

Assuming that the date field is always incremental, you can follow the next procedure

  1. Track the duplicate records and the minimum date of these records
  2. Delete all the records that have date values greater than the minimum date.

A code example:

Step 1:

select name, points, count(id) as rowCount, min(id) as minId, min(`date`) as minDate
from yourTable
where points = 0
group by name
having count(id)>1

Step 2:

delete from yourTable
where id in (
    select id
    from yourTable
    inner join (
            select name, points, min(id) as minId, count(id) as rowCount, min(`date`) as minDate
            from yourTable
            where points = 0
            group by name
            having count(id) > 1
        ) as a on yourTable.name = a.name and yourTable.id > a.minId
    )
and points = 0;

Hope this helps


I think it might be useful to use temp tables to get the ids you want to delete:

-- Step 1: Create a temporary table with the names of the people you want to remove
drop table if exists temp_dup_names;
create temporary table temp_dup_names
    select name, points, min(id) as minId, count(id) as rowCount, min(`date`) as minDate
    from yourTable
    where points = 0
    group by name
    having count(id) > 1;
alter table temp_dup_names
    add index idx_name(name),
    add unique index idx_id(minId);

-- Step 2: Create a temporary table with the ids you want to delete
drop table if exists temp_ids_to_delete;
create temporary table temp_ids_to_delete
    select distinct a.id
    from yourTable as a
    inner join temp_dup_names as b on a.name=b.name and a.id > b.minId
    where points = 0;
alter table temp_ids_to_delete
    add unique index idx_id(id);

-- Step 3: Delete the rows
delete from yourTable
where id in (select id from temp_ids_to_delete);
-- If MySQL is configured in 'safe mode', you may need to add this 
-- to the where condition:
-- and id > 0;
share|improve this answer
    
I do not understand why, but it did not work. Deleted many records, but still left many of the same user 0, in sequence. –  Guttemberg Apr 29 '13 at 17:08
    
are both id and date fields incremental? (i.e. a greater id value is paired with a greater date value). I've edited the post to show a step-by-step solution using temp tables. Check step 2: The temp table should have the Ids you want to delete. If it doesn't have the right Ids, then step 1 must be checked again –  Barranka Apr 29 '13 at 17:11
    
Yes, id and date are incremental –  Guttemberg Apr 29 '13 at 17:15
    
@Guttemberg Ok. Try steps 1 and 2 of the second version of the solution, and check the Ids in the temp_ids_to_delete table (select * from temp_ids_to_delete). The Ids of the rows you want to delete should be there. –  Barranka Apr 29 '13 at 17:20
    
@Guttemberg I tried this procedure on SQL Fiddle,, and I found that the rows that are to be deleted (acording to the data in your post), are ids 15, 16 and 17, because those are the duplicated Ids that fulfill the condition... the row with Id 11 is the first one where Joseph has 0 points... If you need to track the "sequence", then I suggest you use a high-level programming language to track the recors you need to remove. By the way, I modified the queries to filter only the 0 points records –  Barranka Apr 29 '13 at 19:16

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