Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I got this javascript recursive function

function doStuff(graphName) {
    var groupArray = new Array();
    groupArray[0] = "hour";
    groupArray[1] = "day";
    groupArray[2] = "month";
    for(var i = 0; i < groupArray.length; i++) {
        $.get("getchartdata", {"graphName" : graphName, "subgroup" : groupArray[i]})
              .done(function(jsonData){
                  var data = eval(jsonData);
                  drawChart(data, data[0][0], data[0][1]);
              });

    }
    setTimeout(doStuff, 10000);
}

now the problem is that, it works great the first time, but after 10 seconds when tries again, it shows an error:

"TypeError: data[0] is undefined" in drawChart(data, data[0][0], data[0][1]);

Now... why could this be happening?

If i add the parameter in setTimeout(doStuff(graphName), 10000);

The browser crashes.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Do never ever use eval there! (Not for JSON parsing, and not when it is already parsed) –  Bergi Apr 29 '13 at 16:13
    
it's not a recursive function. –  Zo72 Apr 29 '13 at 16:16
    
Remember that $.get is asynchronous so calling doSomething before all calls complete can cause problems if the calls take longer than 10 seconds to complete. You may want to use $.ajax and set async = false. –  ron tornambe Apr 29 '13 at 16:21
    
@rontornambe no, never ever use async: false ! –  Alnitak Apr 29 '13 at 16:22
    
Although I do not believe in hard and fast rules, in this case I do agree async would be a bad idea. A better solution is to include a counter should and not call doSOmething until groupArray.length is reached. –  ron tornambe Apr 29 '13 at 16:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I think what you want is this:

setTimeout(function() { 
    doStuff(graphName); 
}, 10000);

It is also worth noting that if your AJAX call takes more than 10 seconds to complete you may start to see some 'glitches'. Perhaps consider moving the timeout to inside the .done callback (this would mean it run again 10 seconds after the ajax has completed). However, this is just a suggestion, if this doesn't suit your needs then you can keep it as it is. Also, this may not be suitable as you are calling the ajax in a for loop, and you may end up with more timeouts than you want, if you don't implement it correctly

share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you very much for your reply ! since you were the first to post it, i will give you the tick! :) –  msqar Apr 29 '13 at 16:17

If you want to pass on the graphname parameter, you'll need to explicitly do so! Seems like you want

function doStuff(graphName) {
    var groupArray = ["hour", "day", "month"];
    for(var i = 0; i < groupArray.length; i++) {
        $.get("getchartdata", {"graphName" : graphName, "subgroup" : groupArray[i]})
              .done(function(data){
                  drawChart(data, data[0][0], data[0][1]);
              });
    }
    setTimeout(function() {
        doStuff(graphName); // again
    }, 10000);
}

Another possibility would be to bind the argument for the next doStuff invocation:

setTimeout(doStuff.bind(this, graphName), 10000);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! this was the correct answer, but musefan answered first! i'd like to give you the tick too :'( you've been very helpful! –  msqar Apr 29 '13 at 16:18
    
@msqar actually neither answer is the cleanest solution... –  Alnitak Apr 29 '13 at 16:19
    
@Alnitak let me check yours. –  msqar Apr 29 '13 at 16:19
    
@Bergi no, there's a perfectly good way of doing this without repeatedly passing the same parameters (or using .bind) –  Alnitak Apr 29 '13 at 16:20
    
@Alnitak: Not sure whether the extra closure is much cleaner. Depends on the number and variability of parameters and on personal style I'd say… –  Bergi Apr 29 '13 at 16:29

It's usual in this case to do the hard work in an inner function, with the originally supplied parameter available via the closure:

function doStuff(graphName) {
    (function loop() {
         // draw the graph using "graphName" from the outer scope
         ...
         setTimeout(loop, 10000);
    })();  // invoke immediately to start the process
}

using the closure avoids the repetition of passing the parameters over and over, and the additional function wrapper around that call, since you can just pass the reference to the inner function.

This also works well with AJAX - just put the setTimeout call inside the .done handler. As you're making three AJAX calls, try this in the inner function which will wait for all three AJAX calls to complete before starting the timer:

var def = [];

for (var i = 0; i < groupArray.length; i++) {
    def[i] = $.get("getchartdata", {"graphName" : graphName, "subgroup" : groupArray[i]})
          .done(function(data) {
              drawChart(data, data[0][0], data[0][1]);
          });
}

// wait for all three deferred objects to be resolved
$.when.apply($, def).done(function() { setTimeout(loop, 10000) });
share|improve this answer
    
Putting the timeout into the ajax callback gets a bit complicated here since he has 3 of them running in parallel :-) 10s should be fine, and he could use the timeout parameter for avoiding glitches… –  Bergi Apr 29 '13 at 16:21
    
@Bergi nah, that's trivial with a $.when call. –  Alnitak Apr 29 '13 at 16:22
    
$.when.apply($, ["hour", "day", "month"].map(function(g) { return $.get("getchartdata", {"graphName":graphName,"subgroup":g}).done(function(d){ drawChart(d, d[0][0], d[0][1]);}); })).done(setTimeout.bind(window, doStuff.bind(this, graphName), 10000)); might be trivial to us, but not to beginners :-) –  Bergi Apr 29 '13 at 16:28
    
@Bergi well, if you will insist on complicating it with those two .bind calls... –  Alnitak Apr 29 '13 at 16:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.