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Running through some test preparation, I was asked if this would set the first letter color correctly:

td.one::first-letter {
    color:blue;
}

Now, I know I've seen places where the colon is doubled-up on, but a test jsFiddle doesn't show any difference in behavior between that and

td.two:first-letter {
    color:green;
}

So, I'm just curious what the difference is, and why you would use :: instead of : in front of the pseudo-class?

http://jsfiddle.net/mori57/bqE7Q/

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In my defense, do you know how difficult it is to get a clear search result between : and :: on Google? :) I'll take my lumps, however... need to work on my spec-reading stamina! Thanks for the input, all! –  Jason M. Batchelor Apr 29 '13 at 17:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

They're equivalent in this case, but only because it's a pseudo-element, not a pseudo-class. The double-colon syntax was created in order to prevent the confusion arising from calling single-colon pseudo-elements "pseudo-classes" (which your question demonstrates, oddly enough). From the spec:

This :: notation is introduced by the current document in order to establish a discrimination between pseudo-classes and pseudo-elements. For compatibility with existing style sheets, user agents must also accept the previous one-colon notation for pseudo-elements introduced in CSS levels 1 and 2 (namely, :first-line, :first-letter, :before and :after). This compatibility is not allowed for the new pseudo-elements introduced in this specification.

If you're not planning on supporting IE < 9, it is best to denote all your pseudo-elements with double colons going forward. If you require support for older versions of IE, you can continue using single colons, but only for the aforementioned selectors.

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Until I asked this question, I hadn't thought about the distinction between a pseudo-element and a pseudo-class before. Thank you very much for rolling in the specific portion of the spec, and the additional information. –  Jason M. Batchelor Apr 29 '13 at 17:18
    
So, using ::first-letter would be referencing a pseudo-element, whereas :hover denotes a pseudo-class? Just found this interesting explanation of the difference between the two, for anyone else confused (as I was) about the difference: d.umn.edu/~lcarlson/csswork/selectors/pseudo_dif.html –  Jason M. Batchelor Apr 29 '13 at 17:22
    
Yes, :hover is one of the few UI states pseudo-classes –  Adrift Apr 29 '13 at 17:23
1  
@mori57: That's correct. A pseudo-element is an imaginary element that's part of a real element, whereas a pseudo-class is a sort-of "state" that a real element can be in. In your example, ::first-letter represents the first letter of an element's text content, whereas :hover represents the element itself when it is in the hover state. –  BoltClock Apr 29 '13 at 17:23

Checked the spec?

This :: notation is introduced by the current document in order to establish a discrimination between pseudo-classes and pseudo-elements. For compatibility with existing style sheets, user agents must also accept the previous one-colon notation for pseudo-elements introduced in CSS levels 1 and 2 (namely, :first-line, :first-letter, :before and :after). This compatibility is not allowed for the new pseudo-elements introduced in this specification.

http://www.w3.org/TR/selectors/#pseudo-elements

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I must have been looking at the wrong page in the specs... I searched on the document for :: and didn't see this! But then again, my eyes do start to glaze over a bit at times looking at these, so thanks for pointing out the pertinent bit! Will mark your answer as soon as SO lets me. :) –  Jason M. Batchelor Apr 29 '13 at 17:11
    
No worries, but you should probably accept someone else's answer, such as BoltClock's. He gives more of an explanation, I just linked to the spec. –  Christian Varga Apr 29 '13 at 17:13
    
Fair enough. Yours was the first one I read, and it was clear enough from that snippet, though it of course didn't specify the IE-issue. I just tend to naturally assume I will need to check out caniuse.com for more specialized selectors, anyhow. Thanks again! –  Jason M. Batchelor Apr 29 '13 at 17:14

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