Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I've gotten this code in javascript to calculate irregular polygon area from the net.

function polygonArea(X, Y, numPoints)  
{    
area = 0;  // Accumulates area in the loop   
j = numPoints-1;  // The last vertex is the 'previous' one to the first

  for (i=0; i<numPoints; i++)
  { area = area +  (X[j]+X[i]) * (Y[j]-Y[i]); 
      j = i;  //j is previous vertex to i
  }   
  return area/2; 
}

var xPts = [3, 3, 2, 2, 3, 3, 6, 6, 9, 9, 4, 4 ];
var yPts = [2, 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6, 5, 5, 3, 3, 2];

var a = polygonArea(xPts, yPts, 4); 
alert("Area  = " + a);

The results seems to be correct. if the vertex traced by clock-wise direction, it will shows positive results however it will become negative if i traced vertex in anti clockwise direction. Why is that so?

How does this algorithm work? i really want to know what is the mathematical explanation behind it, because i am still having a hard time to understand the explanation on the net.

share|improve this question
1  
This would probably be better suited on programmers.stackexchange.com –  Lee Taylor Apr 29 '13 at 17:55
    
Actually, this question would be a worse fit for programmers.se than for stackoverflow. –  comingstorm Apr 29 '13 at 20:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Imagine drawing horizontal lines from each vertex to the Y axis; for each edge, this will describe a trapezoid:

Y-axis
^
|
|--------o (X[j], Y[j])
|         \
|          \
|           \
|------------o (X[i], Y[i])
|
+----------------------------> X-axis

The formula (X[j]+X[i]) * (Y[j]-Y[i]) in the inner loop computes twice the area of this trapezoid if Y[i] <= Y[j], or negative twice the area if Y[i] >= Y[j].

For a closed polygon, this naturally subtracts the area to the left of the "upgoing" edges from the area to the left of the "downgoing" edges. If the polygon is clockwise, this neatly cuts out the exact (doubled) area of the polygon; if counterclockwise, you get the negative (doubled) area.

To compute the area of a given polygon,

Y-axis
^
|
|        o------o
|        |       \
|        |        \
|        o         \
|         \         o                  
|          \       /
|           \     /
|            \   /
|             \ /
|              o
|
+-------------------------> X-axis

take the downgoing area:

Y-axis
^
|
|--------o------o
|                \
|                 \
|        o         \
|                   o                  
|                  /
|                 /
|                /
|               /
|--------------o
|
+-------------------------> X-axis

minus the upgoing area:

Y-axis
^
|
|--------o      o
|        |
|        |
|        o
|         \         o                  
|          \
|           \
|            \
|             \
|--------------o
|
+-------------------------> X-axis

Although the above example uses a convex polygon, this area computation is correct for arbitrary polygons, regardless of how many up- and down- paths they may have.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks man. That drawing really helps :) –  Charlie Kee May 5 '13 at 14:08

There's no magick behind that. Just have a look at determinant of a matrix (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Determinant#2.C2.A0.C3.97.C2.A02_matrices)

edit:

To be honest: there's some magick in this code:

  1. you need any triangulation. Here: we create triangles starting in (0,0) and having (Xi, Yi) and (Xj, Yj)
  2. you calculate the determinant for each triangle to get: Xi Yj - Xj Yi. But here someone calculates (X[j]+X[i]) * (Y[j]-Y[i]) = Xj Yj - Xj Yi + Xi Yj - Xi Yi = (Xj Yj - Xi Yi) + (Xi Yj - Xj Yi). But happily if you add all those the part (Xj Yj - Xi Yi) canceles itself. So it is the tricky part.
share|improve this answer

It accumulates the signed area between each oriented segment P[i],P[i+1] and the Y axis. At the end of the loop, the area outside the polygon cancels out (it will be counted twice with different signs), and a signed area of the inside remains.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.