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The following problem has been puzzling me for a couple of days (nb: this is not homework).

There exists two geometric sequences that sum to 9. The value of their second term (t2) is 2.

  1. Find the common ratio (r)
  2. Find the first element (t1) of each

The answers to (1) are 2/3 and 1/3 and the answers to (2) are 3 and 6 respectively. Unfortunately, I can't understand how these were derived.

In tackling (1) I've tried to apply algebraic substitution to solve for r as follows:

t2 = t1*r; since t2 = 2 we have:
t1 = 2/r

The equation for calculating the sum (S) of a sequence that converges to a limit is given by:

S  = t1 / (1 - r)

So, I tried to plug my value of t1 into S and solve for r as follows:

9 = (2/r) / (1-r)
9(1-r) = 2/r
2/9 = r(1-r)

Unfortunately, from this point I get stuck. I need to eliminate one of the r's but I can't seem to be able to.

Next, I thought to solve for r using the formula that sums the first 2 terms (S2) of the sequence:

S2 = (t1 (1-r^2)) / (1-r)
t1 + 2 = (t1 (1-r^2)) / (1-r)

but expanding this out I again run into the same problem (can't eliminate one of the r's).

So I have 2 questions:

  1. What am I doing wrong when deriving r?
  2. Once I have one of its values, how I derive the other?
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I do love math but it's not the reason I come to stackoverflow. –  Kai Oct 27 '09 at 3:18
1  
but sequences appear frequently in computer science and most programmers study CS -- so it makes sense to post on a programming forum. :) –  Daniel Oct 27 '09 at 3:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

2/9 = r(1-r)

Unfortunately, from this point I get stuck. I need to eliminate one of the r's but I can't seem to be able to.

You need to learn to factorise!

2/9 = r(1-r)
2/9 = r - r^2
2 = 9r - 9r^2
9r^2 - 9r + 2 = 0
(3r)^2 - 3(3r) + 2 = 0

to make it easier, let R = 3r

R^2 - 3R + 2 = 0
(R - 1)(R - 2) = 0

so 3r - 1 = 0, or 3r - 2 = 0
i.e. r = 1/3 or r = 2/3.

And your first term is 2/(1/3) = 6, or 2/(2/3) = 3

QED!

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Gah! You know, I tried exactly this last night but I must have screwed up the factorisation because it didn't work. Thanks :) –  Daniel Oct 27 '09 at 3:34
    
Factorising is tricky when there are fractions involved. The substitution method (let R = 3r) helps out. The giveaway is that the 'a' and 'b' terms (where ax^2 + bx + c) are multiples of 3. –  Kirk Broadhurst Oct 27 '09 at 3:37

2/9 = r (1 - r)

Rewrite this as ax2 + bx + c and use the quadratic formula to solve it:

2/9 = r - r2
r2 - r + 2/9 = 0

Using the quadratic formula, the roots are:
[-1 ± √(1 - 8/9)] / 2
= (1 ± 1/3) / 2
= 1/2 ± 1/6
= 1/3 or 2/3

Edit: Aw shoot, I spent way too long figuring out how to write plus/minus and square root. :-P

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1  
I like this one better .. the quadratic equation is the "standard" way to solve these kind of things. I sent a link to this question to my daughter, who is in SAT hell this fall! –  tomjedrz Oct 27 '09 at 3:49
    
Isn't first principles better than a derived formula? The methods are the same, just that the quadratic formula is a derivation that doesn't require any understanding of what you are actually doing... –  Kirk Broadhurst Oct 27 '09 at 4:22

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