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so I'm assuming I'm not the only one who's asked this but I have a specific matter I want resolved. Before I start let me just say this is NOT a homework assignment, this is for my convenience and strictly personal use. It isn't so much the coding I'm having an issue with, it's mainly I don't know how to get file access.

I'm developing a program that runs off the command prompt and it is storing all my passwords in the program itself. What I want to know is how can i have the bat file that is running the java file, access another file (like passwords.whatever extension it can read) and store the information there so i don't have to store it in the program. I want to store the data in an array but the primary issue I'm having is how do I get java to access a file, write to it, then able to read it whenever i want to access certain pieces of it.

If something didn't make sense I'll glady elaborate, I just want to make a program for my self being because I have too many passwords to remember in my head.

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1  
Take a look at the Java Properties class. docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Properties.html For general file input and output, look at the java.io package. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Apr 29 '13 at 18:47

2 Answers 2

Learning the entire Java API just to reinvent the functionality available in many high quality , freely available programs seems like overkill.

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for writing a File in Java

   try{
       FileWriter fw=new FileWriter("C://myfile.txt",true);
       BufferedWriter bw = new BufferedWriter(fw);

       bw.write(mystringanddata);
       bw.close();
   }
    catch(Exception e){
       System.out.print("ERROR"+e);
    }

for reading a File in Java

   try{
       FileReader fr=new FileReader("C://myfile.txt",true);
       BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr);

        String mystring;
          while((mystring=br.readLine())!=null){
               System.out.print("DATA IS"+mystring);
          }
       br.close();
   }
    catch(Exception e){
       System.out.print("ERROR"+e);
    }
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You should always call your close() methods from a finally block to avoid resource leaks. Alternatively, you can use the try-with-resources pattern that was added as a part of Java 7. –  matsev Apr 29 '13 at 19:26

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