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I have the following code sections and I am trying to implement a method that returns a list. My structure is as follows : abstract class "Coordinates" -> public class "YCoordinate" with my interface pointing to "YCoordinate". I don't want my interface directly chatting to my abstract class as I feel the implementations of my abstract class is responsible for work.

Interface :

interface IYCoordinate
{
    System.Collections.Generic.List<Coordinates> GetYCoordinateList();
}

Abstract class :

public abstract class Coordinates
{
    private int coordinatePriority;
    private int coordinate;

    public Coordinates(int CoordinatePriority, int Coordinate)
    {
        this.CoordinatePriority = CoordinatePriority;
        this.Coordinate = Coordinate;
    }

    public Coordinates() { }
    public int CoordinatePriority { get { return coordinatePriority; } set { coordinatePriority = value; } }
    public int Coordinate { get { return coordinate; } set { coordinate = value; } }

    public virtual List<Coordinates> GetYCoordinateList()
    {
        throw new System.NotImplementedException();
    }
}

Implementation of Interface and abstract class (this is the part that breaks):

public class YCoordinate : Coordinates, IYCoordinate
{
    public override List<Coordinates> GetYCoordinateList() 
    {
        List<Coordinates> _list = new List<Coordinates>();
        _list.Add(new IYCoordinate(1, 5000));
        _list.Add(new IYCoordinate(2, 100000));
        return _list;
    }
}

However, I am trying to return a list of Coordinates and getting stuck on the public override function in the "YCoordinate" class as I cannot instantiate the Coordinates class directly (because its abstract). How can I return a list of Coordinates? The same error happens if I put in IYCoordinate as shown above.

Maybe my implementation is completely wrong? Any recommendation for doing it better would be welcome.

Later on there will be XCoordinate class and so on. If this approach seems like a bit much its because I am trying to get the hang of the theory behind this.

share|improve this question
    
IYCoordinate.GetYCoordinateList() should return IList<Coordinates>, not List<Coordinates>. –  cdhowie Apr 29 '13 at 19:22
    
@cdhowie it is not required by the compiler to return an interface as a return result of a method defined in an interface. For design and architecture reasons you may choose to do so, however, the definition of the interface as written by the OP is not the issue here. IMO the YCoordinate class is flawed in that it owns a list of itself. This would be better owned by another class. The example by the OP is somewhat confusing. –  CodeMonkeyKing Apr 29 '13 at 20:35
    
@CodeMonkeyKing I never said that the compiler would complain. My comment was intended to instill good design practices, not point out an error. –  cdhowie Apr 29 '13 at 21:37
    
@cdhowie it seems like a commandment and not a design "best practice". It's not a necessity. The problems with the code posted are far deeper than changing to the IList<> interface. –  CodeMonkeyKing Apr 30 '13 at 1:51
    
@CodeMonkeyKing The problems are in fact unrelated, which is why I posted a comment instead of an answer. –  cdhowie Apr 30 '13 at 14:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is how I would do it:

1) you have one interface - IYCoordinate, but you are saying you will want to have IXCoordinate and IZCoordinate too. Just use single interface - ICoordinate and one function - GetCoordinateList:

interface ICoordinate
{
    IList<Coordinates> GetCoordinateList();
}

Actually, this intefrace can be eliminated if you are using my approach

2) in your abstract class you will have a stub for GetCoordinateList which does nothing

public abstract class Coordinates: ICoordinate
{
    public virtual List<Coordinates> GetCoordinateList()
    {
        throw new System.NotImplementedException();
    }
}

Actually you can eliminate ICoordinate interface altogether and use only abstract class. It's ffine.

3) You will derive one(or more than one) classes from that Coordinates class and implement GetCoordinate as you like

public class YCoordinate : Coordinates
{
    public override List<Coordinates> GetCoordinateList() 
    {
        List<Coordinates> _list = new List<Coordinates>();
        _list.Add(new YCoordinate(1, 5000));
        _list.Add(new YCoordinate(2, 100000));
        return _list;
    }
}

Thus you are having one single interface and one single function name to get coordinates from any class derived from Coordinates. If you will add XCoordinate class in future you will need to implement the same function with the same name. And when you will be instantiating XCoordinate or YCoordinate or WhateverCoordinate class you will always know there is a GetCoordinateList function that you need

var coordClass = new XCoordinate();
coordClass.GetCoordinateList();

Moreover, when passing something that has to have GetCoordinateList member you can use your interface ICoordinate or abstract class Coordinates wherever you like.

share|improve this answer
    
In the interface you say IList, I just changed that too list since it was complaining about it. Thought I could have kept IList and change the function in the abstract class and so on. However I am still confused by step nr 3. You say new List<Coordinates> but then talk about YCoordinates in the next line? If I leave it as YCoordinates it complains that there is no constructor for for the two arguments. I cannot change it to Coordinates, since its abstract. –  Sonja Apr 29 '13 at 20:09
    
I moved all the constructors from the abstract class down to YCoordinate instead and now its working. I was hoping however not to have typed with each implementation of the class but then I am having my concrete class now as advised before. –  Sonja Apr 29 '13 at 20:19
    
And thank you, this is a much more elegant solution :) –  Sonja Apr 29 '13 at 20:21
    
@Sonja, you can have a constructor in the abstract class (Coordinates) and you have to call this from your constructor in your derived class (YCoordinate). I'll post it in an answer because it's more readable. –  Koen Apr 29 '13 at 20:24
    
Well if you need to pass those 2 parameters to the base constructor(Coordinates class) there is nothing we can do here - this is how C# language is designed and there is no other option for base class to know those parameters if you don't pass them through. If you don't need those 2 parameters you can just invoke base class' constructor without any parameters. –  Blablablaster Apr 29 '13 at 20:33

On these lines:

_list.Add(new IYCoordinate(1, 5000));
_list.Add(new IYCoordinate(2, 100000));

You need to instantiate an object of a class that derives from the Coordinates class. Here you are trying to create a new instance of an interface, and you cannot do that -- interface members have no definition!

Create a subclass of Coordinates and instantiate that instead. (Or remove the abstract keyword from the definition of this class -- it's not clear why it is abstract anyway, as there are no abstract members.)

share|improve this answer
    
Tx... I missed changed the method in the abstract class to public abstract List<Coordinates> GetYCoordinateList(); Will try and look at your other suggestion now. –  Sonja Apr 29 '13 at 19:37
    
It looks like you want to create an instance of YCoordinate, so try new YCoordinate instead of new YICoordinate. –  cdhowie Apr 29 '13 at 19:37

You need at least one concrete class.

At the moment you only have abstract classes and interfaces.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand now, busy looking at the recommendation from cdhowie below –  Sonja Apr 29 '13 at 19:38

the simple answer....change these two lines:

    _list.Add(new IYCoordinate(1, 5000));
    _list.Add(new IYCoordinate(2, 100000));

to this:

    _list.Add(new YCoordinate(1, 5000));
    _list.Add(new YCoordinate(2, 100000));

note that im creating the class there, not the interface.

Long answer...Blablablaster got that one right :-)

share|improve this answer
  • Starting from Blablablaster answer - In my opinion, you don't need an interface here.

    public abstract class Coordinates { public int CoordinatePriority { get; set; } public int Coordinate { get; set; }

    protected Coordinates(int CoordinatePriority, int Coordinate)
    {
        this.CoordinatePriority = CoordinatePriority;
        this.Coordinate = Coordinate;
    }
    
    public abstract List<Coordinates> GetCoordinateList();
    

    }

As you've noticed I've created an abstract method instead of the method in the interface. Every derived class must implement this method.

class YCoordinate:Coordinates
{
    public YCoordinate(int CoordinatePriority, int Coordinate) : 
        base(CoordinatePriority, Coordinate) //Call constructor of baseclass
    {
    }

    public override List<Coordinates> GetCoordinateList()
    {
        List<Coordinates> list = new List<Coordinates>();
        list.Add(new YCoordinate(1, 5000));
        list.Add(new YCoordinate(2, 100000));
        return list;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this, I am going to play around with this now. Reason being for using interfaces is because I am learning how to implement interfaces and abstracts properly, but I understand its not always necessary to use both of them or at all depending on the scenario. –  Sonja Apr 29 '13 at 20:37

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