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I have a list of lists of Integer that I'm using to build chains based on an input file. The input specifies pairs (e.g. "3, 1" indicates that 1 replaces 3 in the application), and there are overlaps in the pairs (e.g. "3, 1" and "1, 4" would mean that 1 replaces 3 and 4 replaces 1, so ultimately, 4 replaces 3).

In order to reduce all of the pairs into their final chains, I have a list containing lists of all the pairs, and then I find which entries in the list overlap and append to the chains as needed, removing the pair that has been appended to another. This is how I am attempting to do this, but I know the failure is in doubling up the iterator references:

    for (ArrayList<Integer> outerChain : chains) {
        for (ArrayList<Integer> innerChain : chains) {
            if (outerChain.get(0).equals(innerChain.get(innerChain.size() - 1))) {
                outerChain.remove(0);
                innerChain.addAll(outerChain);
                chains.remove(outerChain);
                break;
            }
        }
    }

As an example of the input/desired output from this operation:

    {<1,3>,<2,7>,<7,9>,<8,12>,<9,1>,<6,8>}

being individual lists corresponding to input pairs, the output would be:

    {<2,7,9,1,3>,<6,8,12>}

Is there a way I can nest iterators like this such that the references within each iterator are updated when removing or updating for one or the other?

Thanks in advance for the help!

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I know it's not what you asked about, but why don't you do it with linear complexity? You could just make a array of "who is my direct replacement", find out which elements start chains (do not replace anything) and follow their chains using the values in the array. –  Bartosz Marcinkowski Apr 29 '13 at 19:44
    
Be careful comparing Integers with == - outside a narrow range (I think up to 128 or 256?) it will no longer return what you expect (just like string comparisons). –  thegrinner Apr 29 '13 at 20:01
    
@BartoszMarcinkowski there will be multiple pairs that tag onto the end of a single chain at times, so if I store it off separate and don't update the list, then I may find (from the example above) that I get <2,7,9> and also <9,1,3>, but I would then need to go back over what I pull out to find that <2,7,9,1,3>. –  Belizzle Apr 29 '13 at 20:08
    
@thegrinner I just threw that up there to put sample code up, but thanks for the heads up. I'll update it so it's not made an issue. –  Belizzle Apr 29 '13 at 20:09
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So when should you use the for-each loop? Any time you can. It really beautifies your code. Unfortunately, you cannot use it everywhere. Consider, for example, the expurgate method. The program needs access to the iterator in order to remove the current element. The for-each loop hides the iterator, so you cannot call remove. Therefore, the for-each loop is not usable for filtering. Similarly it is not usable for loops where you need to replace elements in a list or array as you traverse it. Finally, it is not usable for loops that must iterate over multiple collections in parallel. These shortcomings were known by the designers, who made a conscious decision to go with a clean, simple construct that would cover the great majority of cases.

(the For-Each Loop)

You shouldn't use the for-each loop when you remove elements from the list or array while traversing it. Therefore you should use the explicit iterator syntax in your case.

Something like this :

Iterator<ArrayList<Integer>> outer = chains.iterator ();
while (outer.hasNext ()) {
    ArrayList<Integer> outerChain = outer.next();
    Iterator<ArrayList<Integer>> inner = chains.iterator ();
    while (inner.hasNext ()) {
        ArrayList<Integer> innerChain = inner.next();
        if (outerChain.get(0).equals(innerChain.get(innerChain.size() - 1))) {
            outerChain.remove(0);
            innerChain.addAll(outerChain);
            outer.remove();
            break;
        }
    }
}
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This worked perfect. Thanks! –  Belizzle Apr 29 '13 at 20:33
    
You're welcome! –  Eran Apr 30 '13 at 0:20
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Once you modify a list in an iterator you can't use that iterator. Fortunately you need to start again anyway so you have a natural solution

OUTER: while(chains.size() > 1) {
    for (ArrayList<Integer> outerChain : chains) {
            for (ArrayList<Integer> innerChain : chains) {
                if (outerChain.get(0) == innerChain.get(innerChain.size() - 1)) {
                    outerChain.remove(0);
                    innerChain.addAll(outerChain);
                    chains.remove(outerChain);
                    continue OUTER;
                }
            }
        }
    break; // no more matches found.
}
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The problem with this type of approach though is that I do not delete all entries. In the end, there are still chains left, they are just the completed ones, so working off your while condition, the system would never terminate. –  Belizzle Apr 29 '13 at 20:03
    
The system will terminate on the break; which will be performed if there was no matches. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 30 '13 at 5:47
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I do not see any problem with double for-each-loops, but I see a big problem with == operator, which you are using for comparing Integer objects. This is totally incorrect. You should use .equals() method instead.

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