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Hi I am rather new to C++, I have just started learning it after learning some Java basics. I have pre-existing code were it has overloaded the >> operator, however after watching many tutorials and trying to understand the issue, I thought I would ask here.

Rational cpp file:

 #include "Rational.h"

#include <iostream>




Rational::Rational (){

}



Rational::Rational (int n, int d) {
    n_ = n;
    d_ = d;
}

/**
 * Creates a rational number equivalent to other
 */
Rational::Rational (const Rational& other) {
    n_ = other.n_;
    d_ = other.d_;
}

/**
 * Makes this equivalent to other
 */
Rational& Rational::operator= (const Rational& other) {
    n_ = other.n_;
    d_ = other.d_;
    return *this;
}

/**
 * Insert r into or extract r from stream
 */

std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& out, const Rational& r) {
    return out << r.n_ << '/' << r.d_;
}

std::istream& operator>> (std::istream& in, Rational& r) {
    int n, d;
    if (in >> n && in.peek() == '/' && in.ignore() && in >> d) {
        r = Rational(n, d);
    }
    return in;
}}

Rational.h file:

 #ifndef RATIONAL_H_
#define RATIONAL_H_

#include <iostream>
class Rational {
    public:

        Rational ();

        /**
         * Creates a rational number with the given numerator and denominator
         */
        Rational (int n = 0, int d = 1);

        /**
         * Creates a rational number equivalent to other
         */
        Rational (const Rational& other);

        /**
         * Makes this equivalent to other
         */
        Rational& operator= (const Rational& other);

        /**
         * Insert r into or extract r from stream
         */
        friend std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream &out, const Rational& r);
        friend std::istream& operator>> (std::istream &in, Rational& r);
    private:
    int n_, d_;};

    #endif

The function is from a pre-existing class called Rational which takes two ints as parameters. Here is the function to overload >> :

std::istream& operator>> (std::istream& in, Rational& r) {
        int n, d;
        if (in >> n && in.peek() == '/' && in.ignore() && in >> d) {
            r = Rational(n, d);
        }
        return in;
    }

And I'm trying to use it like this, after seeing a few tutorials. (The error I am getting is "Ambiguous overload for operator>> in std::cin>>n1 :

int main () {
// create a Rational Object.
    Rational n1();
    cin >> n1;
 }

Like I said I'm new to this whole overloading operators thing, and figure someone here would be able to point me in the right direction on how to use this function.

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2 Answers 2

Change Rational n1(); to Rational n1;. You've ran into the most vexing parse. Rational n1(); does not instantiate a Rational object, but declares a function named n1 which returns a Rational object.

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Whoa! I would never track this one down if it appear in my code. –  Nemanja Boric Apr 29 '13 at 19:46
    
@Jesse: Nice catch! –  Scott Jones Apr 29 '13 at 19:47
2  
@NemanjaBoric, Sure you can. It's usually as simple as turning on compiler warnings. –  chris Apr 29 '13 at 19:47
    
Okay I did that then it says ' :Rational (int, int)'' which I assume it needs ints as parameters? however the parameters are meant to be received from user input. –  user2333446 Apr 29 '13 at 19:49
    
@user2333446, I have no clue why it wouldn't contain a default constructor, but I'd just supply two dummy values if you can't change the class. –  chris Apr 29 '13 at 19:50
// create a Rational Object.
    Rational n1();

this doesn't create new object but declares a function taking no arguments and returning Rational you probably meant

// create a Rational Object.
    Rational n1;
    cin>>n1;
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