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I know it's probably a long shot, but I thought I'd ask:

Since Ruby does not execute the initialize method of a parent class unless you explicitly call super in the inheriting class's initialize method (or unless you don't overload it in the inheriting class), I was wondering if there's some other way to execute code as part of the parent context (maybe a hook) when instantiating a new instance of an inheriting class...

When implementing B's initialization method, this is currently the behaviour:

class A
    def initialize
        puts "Inside A's constructor"
    end
end

class B < A
    def initialize
        puts "Inside B's constructor"
    end
end

A.new
B.new

# Output
# => Inside A's constructor
# => Inside B's constructor

I was wondering if the output could somehow be:

A.new
# => Inside A's constructor
B.new
# => Inside A's constructor
# => Inside B's constructor
share|improve this question
1  
This is not specific to initialize. It is common to all methods. If a method always implicitly calls the super methods, then, you will not be able to overwrite a method definition of a subclass. That would be very inconvinient. –  sawa Apr 29 '13 at 20:08
    
You are asking for code in A to force something to happen in B, where the language constructs are unfortunately working against you. Depending on context though, you may have options. I presume this is for a purpose, e.g. to simplify sub-classing in a framework? Many frameworks provide alternative ways to generate attributes for instance, such that a constructor in a sub-class is not required, and the base class constructor gets to run without awkward instructions to framework users to "make sure you call super". –  Neil Slater Apr 29 '13 at 21:33
    
I would like to enforce certain inheritance rules. e.g: I don't want classes to inherit from some other classes directly. I wanted to enforce this logic on instantiation of a new object. –  Mikey S. Apr 30 '13 at 5:49

2 Answers 2

Of course you can, simply call super in the subclass initialize method

class A
  def initialize
    puts "Inside A's constructor"
  end
end

class B < A
  def initialize
    super
    puts "Inside B's constructor"
  end
end

A.new
B.new

Output:

Inside A's constructor
Inside A's constructor
Inside B's constructor
share|improve this answer
    
If you look at my original question, I'm well aware to the fact that you can call the constructor from the inheriting class by using super but this kinda loses the purpose I'm after... –  Mikey S. Apr 30 '13 at 5:37
1  
@MikeyS. I'm super-curious what purpose you are after. The question doesn't make it at all clear. super does exactly what you want... –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Apr 30 '13 at 5:48
class A
    def initialize
        puts "Inside A's constructor"
    end
end

class B < A
    def initialize
        super
        puts "Inside B's constructor"
    end
end

A.new
B.new

Output:

Inside A's constructor
Inside A's constructor
Inside B's constructor
share|improve this answer

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