Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public class SleepMessages {
    public static void main(String args[])
        throws InterruptedException {
        String importantInfo[] = {
            "Mares eat oats",
            "Does eat oats",
            "Little lambs eat ivy",
            "A kid will eat ivy too"
        };

        for (int i = 0;
             i < importantInfo.length;
             i++) {
            //Pause for 4 seconds
            Thread.sleep(4000);
            //Print a message
            System.out.println(importantInfo[i]);
        }
    }
}

In this piece of code there's no Thread creation, but does exist Thread.sleep(4000). So what does this Thread represent? The main program itself? In other words, does Thread implicitly the program itself?

share|improve this question
    
It represents the current thread executing the main method. –  asgs Apr 29 '13 at 20:26
    
Thread is Thread class. One interesting thing about it is that the sleep method is class level method, but it will operate on the current thread where it is called. –  nhahtdh Apr 29 '13 at 20:29
    
@nhahtdh how does it accomplish that? –  Lucas Apr 29 '13 at 20:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, Thread.sleep() acts on the current thread, which in your case is simply the one thread that always has to exist to run a program.

share|improve this answer
2  
This is usually called the "main" thread. –  Gray Apr 29 '13 at 20:33
1  
In this case yes, but theoretically it is possible that some other thread call the main method, so "current thread" is as accurate as it gets –  Sentry Apr 29 '13 at 20:58

does Thread implicitly the program itself?

No. To quote from the Thread.sleep() javadocs:

Causes the currently executing thread to sleep (temporarily cease execution) for the specified number of milliseconds, subject to the precision and accuracy of system timers and schedulers.

So Thread.sleep() sleeps the currently running thread which happens to the "main" thread which runs the main(...) method.

So what does this Thread represent? The main program itself?

No. Thread is the name of the class. It depends on what static method you are calling about what it does. For most of the per-thread methods however, (sleep(...), yield(), etc.) Thread.method() applied to the current running thread or Thread.currentThread().

share|improve this answer

In Java, sleep is a static member function of class Thread that causes the thread that calls it to sleep.

share|improve this answer

On every Java program, always exists one Thread at least. The first thread is called 'main'.

Thread.sleep(4000);

Call to the current thread at this moment and it is forced to wait 4000 milliseconds.

You have not created any thread but the Java Virtual machine has created the 'main' thread, responsible to run your program :)

share|improve this answer

The static call to sleep causes the currently executing thread to sleep, in this case to simply to pause the output (as opposed to yielding to another thread or whatever)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.