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I have a large element that is displayed on the screen that I would like to be able to drop on a smaller drop target. Therefore, I want to decrease the size of the draggable clone to match the size of the drop target. I thought it would look nice to animate this. I can't seem to get the smaller clone to center around the cursor while dragging though. Any ideas? Here is a what I tried: http://jsfiddle.net/a3Cj2/

$( ".draggable" ).draggable({
    helper: 'clone',
    start : function(event, ui){
        ui.helper.animate({
            width: 80,
            height: 50
        });
    }, 
    drag : function(event, ui){
        ui.helper.offset({
             left: event.pageX,
             top: event.pageY
        });
    }
});

$("#target").droppable({
    drop : function(event, ui) {
       console.log('dropped');     
    }
});
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Simplest approach by far is to use the cursorAt option with 'left' and 'top' set to half the dimensions of the shrunken helper.

$(".draggable").draggable({
    helper: 'clone',
    start: function (e, ui) {
        ui.helper.animate({
            width: 80,
            height: 50
        });
    },
    cursorAt: {left:40, top:25}
});

Updated fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
This is much more simple, and does the trick. However, it doesn't have quite the same effect of animating the movement to the center. –  Mike Marcacci Apr 29 '13 at 22:46
    
@MikeMarcacci, you're right, the shrink effect here is less attractive than in your answer, though the nett result is the same. For me, the big advantage in this approach is that the helper doesn't end up with margins that could possibly be an issue later in some circumstances. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Apr 29 '13 at 23:13
    
Yes, I do agree with you on that. If the object gets destroyed once it's dropped then using margins is fine, but if it's going to say around for any time after that, then your solution is a much better idea. –  Mike Marcacci Apr 29 '13 at 23:32
    
Thanks guys, both solutions work for me. However, are you actually getting a drop event when you drop in the square? Even if I increase the size of the drop target I am not consistently getting the drop event. I am using Chrome v.26. To be fair, my original fiddle isn't getting the event either, so it is not your additions that are causing it. –  Jon Hargett Apr 30 '13 at 13:45
1  
I discovered the 'tolerance' option in the droppable config. I set it to pointer and it works great. I am going to mark the simpler solution as the answer since it worked for me, but both were great approaches. Up voting both. –  Jon Hargett Apr 30 '13 at 18:35

Wow, that took more work than I thought! Here's the fix:

$( ".draggable" ).draggable({
    helper: 'clone',
    start : function(event, ui){
        ui.helper.animate({
            width: 80,
            height: 50,
            marginLeft: (300-80)/2 - (300/2 - event.offsetX),
            marginTop: (200-50)/2 - (200/2 - event.offsetY)
        });
    }, 
    drag : function(event, ui){

    }
});

$("#target").droppable({
    drop : function(event, ui) {
       console.log('dropped');     
    }
});

You need to account for the event position and center it according to the difference between the centers of both sized draggables.

See fiddle here.

share|improve this answer
    
Note too that I kept the widths and heights in there so you could see what's going on, but (300-80)/2 - (300/2 - event.offsetX) could really be simplified to event.offsetX-40 –  Mike Marcacci Apr 29 '13 at 21:31

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