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I'm trying to write a function in C to copy the contents of a directory to another directory. Here is what I have so far:

void *copydirectory(void *arg1, void *arg2) 
{
  int error;
  struct dirent *direntp;
  DIR *dirp_source, *dirp_destination;
  char *source, *destination;
  copy_t copy;
  char filename[MAXNAME];

  // Set directory arguments
  source = arg1;
  destination = arg2;
  fprintf(stderr, "Source directory is %s and destination directory is %s\n", source, destination);

  // Open directories
  if ((dirp_source = opendir(source)) == NULL)
  {
      fprintf(stderr, "Failed to open %s\n", source);
      return 1;
  }

  if ((dirp_destination = opendir(destination)) == NULL)
  {
      perror("Failed to open destination directory");
      return 1;
  }

  // Read files in directory
  while ((direntp = readdir(dirp_source)) != NULL)
  {
      copy.tid = pthread_self();
      fprintf(stderr, "now at line 64\n");

      // Copy source filename
      if (snprintf(filename, MAXNAME, direntp->d_name) == MAXNAME)
      {
      fprintf(stderr, "Input filename %s is too long", direntp->d_name);
      continue;
      } 

      fprintf(stderr, "now at line 73\n");

      fprintf(stderr, "%s\n", filename);
      // Open file for reading
      if ((copy.args[0] = open(filename, R_FLAGS)) == -1)
      {
      fprintf(stderr, "Failed to open source file %s: %s\n", filename, strerror(errno));
      continue;
      }

      // Create destination filename for writing
      if (snprintf(filename, MAXNAME, "%s", direntp->d_name) == MAXNAME)
      {
      fprintf(stderr, "Output filename %s is too long\n", direntp->d_name);
      continue;
      }

      fprintf(stderr, "%s\n", filename);  
      // Open file for writing
      if ((copy.args[1] = open(filename, W_FLAGS, W_PERMS)) == -1)
      {
      fprintf(stderr, "Failed to open destination file %s: %s\n", filename,      strerror(errno));
      continue;
      }

      if (error = pthread_create((&copy.tid), NULL, copyfilepass, copy.args))
      {
      fprintf(stderr, "Failed to create thread: %s\n", strerror(error));
      copy.tid = pthread_self();
      }
  }

  // Close directory
  while ((closedir(dirp_source) == -1) && (errno = EINTR));

  fprintf(stderr, "Successfully copied all files in directory \n");

}

Now, for testing I simply have 2 directories in the folder named dir1 and dir2. dir1 contains 3 files: file1, file2, file3. But, when I compile and run the code, I get these messages:

./
./
Failed to open destination file .: is a directory
Failed to open source file file2: No such file or directory
Failed to open source file file3: No such file or directory
../
../
Failed to open destination file .: is a directory
Failed to open source file file1: No such file or directory

Anyone have any suggestions on what's wrong?

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1 Answer 1

Failed to open destination file .: is a directory

You see this because your source directory contains links called "." and ".." to itself and its parent directory respectively. You should specifically check for and avoid these entries.

Failed to open source file file2: No such fle or directory

You see this because you're trying to open a file called "file2" in the process's current working directory, but that doesn't exist - the file you're after is in the source directory. You need to build the filename taking this into account:

// Copy source filename
if (snprintf(filename, MAXNAME, "%s/%s", source, direntp->d_name) == MAXNAME)
share|improve this answer
    
So I changed the snprint function like you said, but I still get the same errors. I'm not quite sure what adding the "%s/%s" does –  zyxxwyz Apr 30 '13 at 0:41
1  
@zyxxwyz: direntp->d_name is the name of the file in the source directory. If you just pass that to the open() function then it doesn't know that you want to open the file in the source directory - it will try to open it in the current directory. Instead you need to build the path "<source dir>/<file>" and pass that to the open() function. –  caf Apr 30 '13 at 1:09
    
Ugh, I've been trying but I'm not sure how to do that. I'm not really sure how to use paths in C. Are there any more hints you could give me? –  zyxxwyz Apr 30 '13 at 1:18
1  
@zyxxwyz: Try printing out the filename you're trying to open immediately before each of the open() calls. –  caf Apr 30 '13 at 1:22
1  
@zyxxwyz: I think you need to update the question with the code that you're trying now, and the output it produces. –  caf Apr 30 '13 at 1:40

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