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I'm new to mobile app development. I would like to ask about what precautions I should be taking to avoid infringing on any intellectual property or copyrights. I'm looking to make apps without having to worry about if I'll get sued or whatever once I launch the app. Since I'm a newbie here, any and all advice is welcome. Thanks to everyone in advance!

EDIT

I want to add some specific scenarios.

What happens if the code I honestly write happens to "look" like the code of another app? Maybe not completely, but to a great extent? Or maybe the code is identical in "essence?"

Also, what happens if the way the code is written for a particular task is the only way to write the code, minus any particular library used?

Furthermore, what are the restrictions on my UI? I think it would be unrealistic to go out and check the UI of every app that's out there before making my own. And what about specific icon art that may have turned out to be the same?

Finally, even if after all the checking it turns out that I missed something, will the party pressing charges give me a chance to make the necessary changes to my app so that it's no longer in violation of the terms in question before proceeding?

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closed as off topic by Michael Petrotta, talonmies, Jean-Bernard Pellerin, Vishal, Eelke Apr 30 '13 at 4:21

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Good resource for info and getting an idea of the legal landscape if you intend to use copyrighted work in your project: Stanford Copyright & Fair Use Center. –  Maggy May Apr 30 '13 at 1:17
    
@MaggyMay Thanks for the link, but I'd rather not have to read through such a big resource if i don't have to. Is there a concise summary of what's what? Or maybe some general strategy I should be following? –  ThisIsNotAnId Apr 30 '13 at 1:31
    
@ThisIsNotAnld Unfortunately, copyright is a very deep and complex field. Generally and if you're not looking to use copyrighted images, code, music, et al.: if you're honest and don't steal things, you're good. It's kind of hard for someone to get mad and sue you if you didn't do anything actually wrong. –  Maggy May Apr 30 '13 at 1:41
    
@MaggyMay Alright, sounds like a plan. Thanks! –  ThisIsNotAnId Apr 30 '13 at 2:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well this all comes down to if you are using your own code or using someone else's. If you got the code from someone there is going to be a licenses agreement that came with it. You should read this very carefully if you are planning on making money off of your application. However if you are looking to create an opensource project chances are you are in the clear.

Really all you need to worry about is not stealing someones code. Which is pretty easy stick with opensource libraries on github and other like websites. Also make sure you read the agreements the libraries come with also the agreements of any of those libraries dependencies.

You are going to want to look at the BSD license, the GNU licenses and Apache licenses to start. You can always use a "premium" library, that is a library you pay for, as long as you indeed pay for it and follow the restrictions of use imposed by the seller.

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Ahh, I see. So what happens if the code I honestly write happens to "look" like the code of another app? Maybe not completely, but to a great extent? Or maybe the code is identical in "essence?" Also, what happens if the way the code is written for a particular task is the only way to write the code, minus any particular library used? Maybe I should include this in the op haha. –  ThisIsNotAnId Apr 30 '13 at 1:18
    
If you're being asked to cease and desist by some random dude on the internet: stand your ground. If some company or organization (with significant cash) asks you to, stand down. If you're going to be in a situation that is risky like that, be warned that large copyright holders can drain your funds using dirty legal tricks. This is why corporations like YouTube and others don't challenge copyright claims very seriously when they're made by corporations like EMI or Universal. It's not worth it. –  Maggy May Apr 30 '13 at 1:19
    
@MaggyMay is most definitely right about that one. If some corporation like EA or something comes after you, cease and desist immediately or see everything you have accomplished gobbled up by them. –  Nomad101 Apr 30 '13 at 1:21
    
@ThisIsNotAnId that is a matter for the courts to decide, honestly most of the time it never gets that far anyway. I would focus on making your work beautiful and flawless and keep records of every step to help ensure you can say yea this is mine later on. Such as you have a github page with 10000 commits over a few years chances are its yours ;). –  Nomad101 Apr 30 '13 at 1:22
    
So, is the consensus that I should focus on writing apps and if something comes up by a serious contender I should do as requested? Will I be able to salvage the rest of my app if I have to and continue to have that deployed? –  ThisIsNotAnId Apr 30 '13 at 1:34

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