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How do I join multiple tables when I only want to join if a particular condition is satisfied?

Example:

TABLE A
NUM    TYPE
1      DUPLICATE
2      DUPLICATE
3      INTERACT

TABLE B
ID     REF_TYPE     REF_ID
1      ORDER        000001
1      SEVERE       NULL
1      CATALOG      993004
2      ORDER        003320
2      CATALOG      994002
3      MILD         NULL
3      INTERACTION  NULL
3      CATALOG      992002

Now here's where it gets tricky...

ORDER_TABLE
ID          ORDER_NAME
000001      ORDER1
003320      ORDER2

CATALOG_TABLE
ID          CATALOG_NAME
992002      CATALOG1
993004      CATALOG2
994002      CATALOG3

What I want to do:

JOINED TABLE
NUM     TYPE          ORDER_NAME     CATALOG_NAME
1       DUPLICATE     ORDER1         CATALOG2
2       DUPLICATE     ORDER2         CATALOG3
3       INTERACT      NULL           CATALOG1

In fact, there are more than just order and catalog tables that I need to join, but this is a sample to get an idea of how you can do the logic of the join to satisfy the condition.

I tried outer joining the tables with multiple selects (table_b b, table_b b1, table_b b2, etc.), however, I can't seem to figure out if there is a way to syntax the joins so that you can join only if a condition is fulfilled- join B1.REF_ID to ORDER_TABLE.ID; but only when B1.REF_TYPE='ORDER'.

Can anyone help?

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Put the extra conditions in a WHERE clause. –  Barmar Apr 30 '13 at 1:19
    
Show the query you tried. –  Barmar Apr 30 '13 at 1:19

3 Answers 3

You can do this with a combination of coalesce() and left joins. Here is a sql server example, but I've done it with oracle.

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If I understand what you're trying to do, put the condition in the ON clause:

SELECT a.num, a.type, o.order_name, c.*
  FROM table_a a
  LEFT JOIN table_b b1 ON b1.id = a.num AND b1.ref_type = 'ORDER'
  LEFT JOIN order_table o ON o.id = b1.ref_id
  LEFT JOIN table_b b2 ON b2.id = a.num AND b2.ref_type = 'CATALOG'
  LEFT JOIN catalog_table c ON c.id = b2.ref_id
 ORDER BY a.num

Here is a SQLFiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm... I tried this earlier, but the visual builder I was using was nesting the joins for optimization and for some reason the ON didn't like the AND and would result in no query results. I'll see if un-nesting helps resolve this. For reference, >LEFT JOIN A ON (A=B AND B='B') would be the proper syntax? Or should it be left outside of parenthesis? –  Jjavitz Apr 30 '13 at 3:37
    
Parentheses are optional. If they help with clarity, go ahead. I usually leave them out. –  eaolson Apr 30 '13 at 23:13

Something like this should work using MAX with CASE and GROUP BY, along with using LEFT JOIN:

SELECT A.NUM, A.TYPE,
    MAX(CASE WHEN B.REF_TYPE = 'ORDER' THEN O.ORDER_NAME END) ORDER_NAME,
    MAX(CASE WHEN B.REF_TYPE = 'CATALOG' THEN C.CATALOG_NAME END) CATALOG_NAME
FROM TABLE_A A
    LEFT JOIN TABLE_B B ON A.NUM = B.ID
    LEFT JOIN ORDER_TABLE O ON B.REF_ID = O.ID
    LEFT JOIN CATALOG_TABLE C ON B.REF_ID = C.ID
GROUP BY A.Num, A.Type

SQL Fiddle Demo

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Couldn't get it to work with Max... Can you explain how Max works in this case? sqlfiddle.com/#!4/0fcca/10 –  Jjavitz Apr 30 '13 at 3:54
    
@Jjavitz -- please see edits along with SQL Fiddle Demo updates. Best regards. –  sgeddes Apr 30 '13 at 12:37
    
Thanks. I'm still not sure I understand how MAX works with character strings, but at least I see how it works. –  Jjavitz Apr 30 '13 at 14:59
    
@Jjavitz -- think about it like this. Using MAX(Field) -- you're asking for the MAX of the field value. Using MAX(SomeExpression) -- you're asking for the MAX of the result of expression. So the result of the expression in this case could be O.Order_Name or NULL -- and the MAX of that would be the O.Order_Name if it existed. Hope that helps a little. Best regards. –  sgeddes Apr 30 '13 at 15:09
    
Aha, that makes sense now. Thanks. –  Jjavitz Apr 30 '13 at 19:53

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