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I have recently been performing some leak checking on a particularly gnarly piece of recursive XS, and was very pleased when I managed to get all my reference counting working nicely.

Imagine my shock then when I discovered a leak in a comparatively benign piece of Pure Perl!

Can anybody tell me why on earth this seemingly harmless recursive function is leaking like a mad thing? (Linux, Ubuntu 12.10, 64-bit).

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Devel::Leak;

sub annotated_hex {
    my $annotated = shift;
    if (ref $annotated ne 'HASH') { return '<' . (ref $annotated) . '>'; }

    my $hex = '';
    if (defined $annotated->{hex}) {
        $hex .= $annotated->{hex};
    }
    if (defined $annotated->{elements}) {
        if (ref $annotated->{elements} eq 'ARRAY') {
            foreach my $element (@{ $annotated->{elements} }) {
                $hex .= &annotated_hex ($element);
            }
        } else {
            $hex .= '<Elements=' . (ref $annotated->{elements}) . '>';
        }
    }        
    return $hex;
}

Devel::Leak::NoteSV (my $handle);
my $annotated = { 'hex' => 'a824', 'elements' => [ { 'hex' => '0201', }, ] };
my $annotated_hex = &annotated_hex ($annotated);

undef $annotated_hex;
undef $annotated;
Devel::Leak::CheckSV ($handle);
1;

Output is lots of leaks...

$ perl annotate.pl 
new 0x22d8a80 : SV = NULL(0x0) at 0x22d8a80
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (PADMY)
new 0x22d8f78 : SV = NULL(0x0) at 0x22d8f78
...[24 leaked entries in total]

What's up with that?!

share|improve this question
    
nit: why are you calling your functions with &? I don't really think this is the problem, but it also doesn't seem that you need them (to subvert prototypes). –  Joel Berger Apr 30 '13 at 1:40
    
Force of habit, I started with Perl 4. :) And nope, it doesn't affect the leaks. :( –  the.jxc Apr 30 '13 at 2:43

2 Answers 2

I'm not sure that 'leak' is the right word to use here. I augmented your example with multiple calls to annotated_hex and using multiple different hash references and strings, and the total count of new elements returned from CheckSV was always 25 more than those in NoteSV

In other words, the leak wasn't growing. I suspect that the 25 comes from some new internal perl references created as needed when evaluating your function.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm... I'll play around that area and see what that shows... –  the.jxc Apr 30 '13 at 22:01

what is your perl -V? it doesn't leak for me on win32 citrusperl v5.16.1, if I could comment this would be a comment :)

update: here is code, change the loop amount, change the size of the data structure, it doesn't grow

#!/usr/bin/perl --
use strict;
use warnings;
use Devel::Leak;

sub annotated_hex {
    my $annotated = shift;
    if (ref $annotated ne 'HASH') { return '<' . (ref $annotated) . '>'; }

    my $hex = '';
    if (defined $annotated->{hex}) {
        $hex .= $annotated->{hex};
    }
    if (defined $annotated->{elements}) {
        if (ref $annotated->{elements} eq 'ARRAY') {
            foreach my $element (@{ $annotated->{elements} }) {
                $hex .= &annotated_hex ($element);
            }
        } else {
            $hex .= '<Elements=' . (ref $annotated->{elements}) . '>';
        }
    }        
    return $hex;
}

for(1..100){
    print ' ', Devel::Leak::NoteSV (my $handle);
    my $annotated = {
        'hex' => 'a824',
        'elements' => [
            map {; { 'hex' => '0201'.$_ } } 1 .. ( 100*$_ )
        ],
    };

    my $annotated_hex = &annotated_hex ($annotated);

    undef $annotated_hex;
    undef $annotated;
    print ' ', Devel::Leak::CheckSV ($handle);
}
1;
__END__
new 009EC17C :
new 009EC1AC :
new 009DF6CC :
new 009DF89C :
new 009DFC8C :
new 009AAAE4 :
new 009AAD04 :
new 009AAFB4 :
new 0099AEF4 :
new 0099AF04 :
new 0099AF14 :
new 0099AF24 :
new 0099AF84 :
new 0099AF94 :
new 0099AFD4 :
new 0099AFE4 :
new 0099AFF4 :
new 0099B4A4 :
new 0099B604 :
new 003F915C :
new 003F916C :
new 003F91AC :
new 003F91CC :
new 003F91FC :
 2256 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280
 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280
 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280
 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280
 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280
 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280
 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280
 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280
 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280 2280
share|improve this answer
    
$ perl -v = "This is perl 5, version 14, subversion 2 (v5.14.2) built for x86_64-linux-gnu-thread-multi" (perl -V is a bit too big to put in a comment)! –  the.jxc Apr 30 '13 at 21:59
    
but perl -V isn't too big for your post -- although I don't think its required, I've update my post –  optional May 13 '13 at 4:27

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