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So, I was considering using forking or threading to do some simple parralelization. To make sure that it was worth it, I wrote three simple scripts to benchmark sequential vs threading vs forking. I used two very simple methods to initialize an array of arrays and then another method to find the max element in each array and write it to a file.

Methods:

sub initialize
{
    for (my $i=0; $i <= 2; $i++)
    {
        for (my $j=0; $j < 5000000; $j++)
        {
        $array[$i][$j]=$j+$i;
        }
    }
}  

sub getMax 
{
        my $num = shift;
        my $array = shift;
        my $length=scalar(@{$array});
        my $max=-9**9**9;
        my @ra;

        for (my $i=0; $i < $length; $i++) 
        {
            if ($max < ${$array}[$i])
            {
            $max=${$array}[$i];
            }
        }

        tie @ra, 'Tie::File', "test.txt" or die;
        $ra[$num]=$max;
}

Sequential:

my $start = Time::HiRes::time();
for (my $count = 0; $count <= 2; $count++) 
{
    getMax($count,$array[$count]);
}

my $stop = Time::HiRes::time();
my $duration = $stop-$start;
print "Time spent: $duration\n"; 
print "End of main program\n";

Threading:

my @threads=();
my $start = Time::HiRes::time();
for (my $count = 0; $count <= 2; $count++) 
{
    my $t = threads->new(\&getMax, $count, $array[$count]);
    push(@threads,$t);
}

foreach (@threads) 
{
    my $num = $_->join;
}

my $stop = Time::HiRes::time();
my $duration = $stop-$start;
print "Time spent: $duration\n";
print "End of main program\n";

Forking:

my $pm = Parallel::ForkManager->new(3);
my $start = Time::HiRes::time();

for (my $count = 0; $count <= 2; $count++)
{
    my $pid = $pm->start and next;   
    getMax($count,$array[$count]);
    $pm->finish; 
}

$pm->wait_all_children;

my $stop = Time::HiRes::time();
my $duration = $stop-$start;

print "Time spent: $duration\n";
print "\nEnd of main program\n";

Sequential: 2.88 sec

Threading: 4.10 sec

Forking: 3.88 sec

I guess that for my purposes (obviously not this, but something not too much more computationally intensive), threading/forking is not helpful. I understand that the two are not solely used for temporal efficiency, but I imagine that's one of the benefits depending on what you're doing. So, my question is when exactly does threading/forking actually make one's code run faster?

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So, when I tested everything on Linux, forking was actually significantly faster that doing it sequentially and with threading. –  Steve P. May 2 '13 at 18:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The processor and memory are the fastest components of a computer. Because fast memory is also expensive, disk drives are used to store large amounts of data inexpensively, with the trade-off that it is very much slower to access.

When computer programs rely on data from slow media, the faster components can often be left with nothing to do until the necessary data arrives. The primary use of multithreading is to allow the processor to get on with something else while waiting for a required resource.

The sorts of things that can be done in parallel are

  • Keeping the user interface functional while waiting for something to complete

  • Doing multi-processor calculations

  • Fetching data from from multiple internet sites

  • Reading from multiple disk drives

The important thing about all of these is that multithreading is only advantageous if the threads don't compete with each other for the same resources.

Trying to speed up a disk read by reading half the data in each of two threads, for instance, will not be successful, because there is a bottleneck at the disk controller and a limit to how fast it can return data. But RAID drives can speed things up by reading part of the data from each of several drives at the same time.

In your example, there is only one processor that can do the maximum calculation. Getting several threads doing it doesn't mean the processor can do the work any faster, and in fact it will be slowed down by having to switch between threads. However, if you could arrange for each thread to be run on a separate processor of a multi-processor system you would get an advantage. This technique is often used by audio-visual software to get the maximum speed of processing.

Similarly, fetching data from multiple internet sources in parallel can be very useful, but only until the capacity of the link has been reached, when the threads will start competing with each other for bandwidth.

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