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I need to go through a HTML string and replace characters with 0 (zero), except tags, spaces and line breaks. I created this code bellow, but it is too slow. Please, can someone help me to make it faster (optimize)?

procedure TForm1.btn1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  Txt: String;
  Idx: Integer;
  Tag: Boolean;
begin
  Tag := False;
  Txt := mem1.Text;
  For Idx := 0 to Length(Txt) - 1 Do
  Begin
    If (Txt[Idx] = '<') Then
      Tag := True Else
    If (Txt[Idx] = '>') Then
    Begin
      Tag := False;
      Continue;
    end;
    If Tag Then Continue;
    If (not (Txt[Idx] in [#10, #13, #32])) Then
      Txt[Idx] := '0';
  end;
  mem2.Text := Txt;
end;

The HTML text will never have "<" or ">" outside tags (in the middle of text), so I do not need to worry about this.

Thank you!

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2  
Could you provide an example of desired input and output? –  MBo Apr 30 '13 at 5:18
1  
This code will fail for valid HTML. You cannot parse HTML robustly that way. –  David Heffernan Apr 30 '13 at 15:11
    
Define too slow. It looks like it will run pretty quickly to me -- it is just a loop. –  Rob Apr 30 '13 at 16:37
    
You are indexing the string from zero. Unless you have a Delphi version with compiler directive {$ZEROBASEDSTRINGS ON} this would cause an error. –  LU RD May 1 '13 at 9:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Edit: Looks like I was wrong - UniqueString is not the problem. The actual bottleneck seems to be accessing the string by character. Given that my entire answer was irrelevent, I've completely replaced it.

If you use a PChar to avoid recalculating the string offset, while still updating the string via Txt[Idx], the method is much faster (5 seconds down to 0.5 seconds in my test of 1000 runs).

Here's my version:

procedure TForm1.btn1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  Idx: Integer;
  Tag: Boolean;
  p : PChar;
  Txt : string;
begin
  Tag := False;
  Txt := Mem1.Text;
  p := PChar(txt);
  Dec(p);
  For Idx := 0 to Length(Txt) - 1 Do
  Begin
    Inc(p);
    If (not Tag and (p^ = '<')) Then begin
      Tag := True;
      Continue;
    end
    Else If (Tag and (p^ = '>')) Then
    Begin
      Tag := False;
      Continue;
    end;
    If Tag Then Continue;
    If (not (p^ in [#10, #13, #32])) Then begin
      Txt[Idx] := '0';
    end;
  end;
  mem2.Text := Txt;
end;
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2  
"Copy-on-write semantics" does not mean that every time you change something, the entire thing gets copied; it means that the external behavior will be identical to what you would see if the entire thing got copied. As Barry Kelly wrote in answer to the linked question, this is to ensure that "no other references to the same string will be affected." This doesn't mean a copy is always made, just that it will be made if necessary. But even the check for that can be expensive in a tight loop. –  Mason Wheeler Apr 30 '13 at 5:01
    
Ah, I see. Thanks! –  Blorgbeard Apr 30 '13 at 5:04
    
Thank you! I will make tests and let you know about results. –  Paruba Apr 30 '13 at 12:42
    
@Blorgbeard Your answer still contains incorrect facts. You should correct it. –  David Heffernan Apr 30 '13 at 15:10
    
@DavidHeffernan can you elaborate? –  Blorgbeard Apr 30 '13 at 20:54

That looks pretty straightforward. It's hard to be sure without profiling the code against the data you're using, (which is always a good idea; if you need to optimize Delphi code, try running it through Sampling Profiler first to get an idea where you're actually spending all your time,) but if I had to make an educated guess, I'd guess that your bottleneck is in this line:

Txt[Idx] := '0';

As part of the compiler's guarantee of safe copy-on-write semantics for the string type, every write to an individual element (character) of a string involves a hidden call to the UniqueString routine. This makes sure that you're not changing a string that something else, somewhere else, holds a reference to.

In this particular case, that's not necessary, because you got the string fresh in the start of this routine and you know it's unique. There's a way around it, if you're careful.

CLEAR AND UNAMBIGUOUS WARNING: Do not do what I'm about to explain without making sure you have a unique string first! The easiest way to accomplish this is to call UniqueString manually. Also, do not do anything during the loop that could assign this string to any other variable. While we're doing this, it's not being treated as a normal string. Failure to heed this warning can cause data corruption.

OK, now that that's been explained, you can use a pointer to access the characters of the string directly, and get around the compiler's safeguards, like so:

procedure TForm1.btn1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  Txt: String;
  Idx: Integer;
  Tag: Boolean;
  current: PChar; //pointer to a character
begin
  Tag := False;
  Txt := mem1.Text;
  UniqueString(txt); //very important
  if length(txt) = 0 then
    Exit; //If you don't check this, the next line will raise an AV on a blank string
  current := @txt[1];
  dec(current); //you need to start before element 1, but the compiler won't let you
                //assign to element 0
  For Idx := 0 to Length(Txt) - 1 Do
  Begin
    inc(current); //put this at the top of the loop, to handle Continue cases correctly
    If (current^ = '<') Then
      Tag := True Else
    If (current^ = '>') Then
    Begin
      Tag := False;
      Continue;
    end;
    If Tag Then Continue;
    If (not (current^ in [#10, #13, #32])) Then
      current^ := '0';
  end;
  mem2.Text := Txt;
end;

This changes the metaphor. Instead of indexing into the string as an array, we're treating it like a tape, with the pointer as the head, moving forward one character at a time, scanning from beginning to end, and changing the character under it when appropriate. No redundant calls to UniqueString, and no repeatedly calculating offsets, which means this can be a lot faster.

Be very careful when using pointers like this. The compiler's safety checks are there for a good reason, and using pointers steps outside of them. But sometimes, they can really help speed things up in your code. And again, profile before trying anything like this. Make sure that you know what's slowing things down, instead of just thinking you know. If it turns out to be something else that's running slow, don't do this; find a solution to the real problem instead.

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Thank you! I will make tests and let you know about results. –  Paruba Apr 30 '13 at 12:41
    
@Mason Do you really think this will make any measurable difference to performance? I must admit I'd be surprised that UniqueString could cost enough in to matter, when consider relative to the rest of the loop. –  David Heffernan Apr 30 '13 at 15:12
    
@David: The loop itself is pretty straightforward and ought to be trivial in cost. Can you see any other place where this could be a performance bottleneck? –  Mason Wheeler Apr 30 '13 at 15:41
    
@MasonWheeler check my edited answer - looks like it's not UniqueString after all. –  Blorgbeard Apr 30 '13 at 22:22
    
@Blorgbeard: I would almost accuse you of copying my code for your edited answer, except that your version contains two bugs that mine does not. ;) –  Mason Wheeler Apr 30 '13 at 22:40

I did some profiling and came up with this solution.

  • A test for > #32 instead of [#10,#13,#32] gains some speed (thanks @DavidHeffernan).
  • A better logic in the loop also gives a bit extra speed.
  • Accessing the string exclusively with the help of a PChar is more effective.

procedure TransformHTML( var Txt : String);
var
  IterCnt : Integer;
  PTxt    : PChar;
  tag     : Boolean;
begin
  PTxt := PChar(Txt);
  Dec(PTxt);
  tag := false;
  for IterCnt := 0 to Length(Txt)-1 do
  begin
    Inc(PTxt);
    if (PTxt^ = '<') then
      tag := true
    else
    if (PTxt^ = '>') then
      tag := false
    else
    if (not tag) and (PTxt^ > #32) then
      PTxt^ := '0';
  end;
end;

This solution is about 30% more effective than Mason's solution and 2.5 times more effective than Blorgbeard's.

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