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I see the Nginx HttpRewriteModule documentation has an example to rewrite a www-prefixed domain to a non-www-prefixed domain:

if ($host ~* www\.(.*)) {
  set $host_without_www $1;
  rewrite ^(.*)$ http://$host_without_www$1 permanent; # $1 contains '/foo', not 'www.mydomain.com/foo'
}

How can I do the reverse-- rewrite a non-www-prefixed domain to a www-prefixed domain? I thought maybe I could do something like the following but Nginx doesn't like the nested if statement.

if ($host !~* ^www\.) {                       # check if host doesn't start with www.
    if ($host ~* ([a-z0-9]+\.[a-z0-9]+)) {    # check host is of the form xxx.xxx (i.e. no subdomain)
        set $host_with_www www.$1;
        rewrite ^(.*)$ http://$host_with_www$1 permanent;
    }
}

Also I wanted this to work for any domain name without explicitly telling Nginx to rewrite domain1.com -> www.domain1.com, domain2.com -> www.domain2.com, etc. since I have a large number of domains to rewrite.

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5 Answers 5

If possible, you should never use the if directive in Nginx, since as soon as you have an if in your configuration your server needs to evaluate every single request to decide whether to match that if or not.

Read up on http://docs.ngx.cc/en/latest/topics/tutorials/config_pitfalls.html

A better solution would be multiple server directives.

server {
        listen 80;
        server_name website.com;
        return 301 $scheme://www.website.com$request_uri;
}

server {
        listen 80;
        server_name www.website.com;
        ... 
}

If you're trying to serve an SSL (https) enabled site, you got more or less three different options.

  1. Set up multiple IP addresses having each server directive listening on their own IP (or different ports, if that's an option for you). This options needs SSL certificates for both website.com and www.website.com, so either you have a wild card certificate, a UNI certificate (multiple domains) or just plainly two different certificates.
  2. Do the rewrite in the application.
  3. Use the dreaded IF directive.

There is as well an option to use SNI, but I'm not sure this is fully supported as of now, there are some more information here: http://nginx.org/en/docs/http/configuring_https_servers.html#sni

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Your simple code did the trick. Thanks a bunch! –  Kyle Carlson Jul 22 '13 at 20:35
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The nginx documentation cautions against the use of if for rewriting. Please see the link here: http://wiki.nginx.org/Pitfalls#Server_Name

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if ($host ~* ^[^.]+\.[^.]+$) {
    rewrite ^(.*)$ http://www.$host$1 permanent;
}

It's only possible to get valid hostnames because the request will never make it to your server otherwise, so there's no need to build your own validation logic.

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up vote 10 down vote accepted

Well I guess I don't really need the outer "if" statement since I'm only checking for domains of the form xxx.xxx anyways. The following works for me, though it's not robust. Let me know if there is a better solution.

    if ($host ~* ^([a-z0-9\-]+\.(com|net|org))$) {
        set $host_with_www www.$1;
        rewrite ^(.*)$ http://$host_with_www$1 permanent;
    }

Edit: Added hyphen to the regular expression since it is a valid character in a hostname.

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if ($host !~* ^www\.) {
    rewrite ^(.*)$ http://www.$host$1 permanent;
}
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This doesn't work for me because I don't want to rewrite subdomains like static.mydomain.com. I probably should have stated that in my question. Thanks for your answer. –  saltycrane Nov 9 '09 at 18:18
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