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I'm writing an application server and I've decided to use AES128/CTR/NoPadding to secure connections, as it's considered to be secure enough without having to expand the bytes to the block boundary and I thought it's a good fit to TCP which is logically a seamless stream.

The problem is that Cipher.update() doesn't return the encrypted block until it has a full 16-byte block because CTR is basically based on a block cipher though simulating a stream cipher. I should read data from a tcp socket and process messages as soon as they arrive, but I can't retrieve the most recent block because it's still building up and its size is less than 16 bytes. And I can't just wait because we don't know when the next message would be sent. Of course I could call Cipher.doFinal() to get the leftover but that would mean the end of the stream (connection) and the Cipher object would be reinitialized.

I thought it would be nice if there's a way to peek the carryover. CTR simply XORs the plain text with the keystream so I should be able to get the encrypted data regardless of the rest of the bytes in the block. Would there be a nice workaround to this problem? I'm thinking about writing a wrapper that encrypts fake plain text with zeroes to get the keystream in advance and XORs manually, but I wonder how other people solved this problem.

Update

I'm developing an Android application and it turned out that this is the problem of the Dalvik VM. As Robert and monnand pointed out below, Java SE doesn't have this problem at least with the default provider. I think I'll have to write a wrapper class or change the mode to CFB8 to get around this problem. (CTR8 didn't work) Thanks for all the responses!

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Can you pad messages so that their length is a multiple of 16? This would ensure that you always end up with a decryptable chunk. –  Chris Heald Apr 30 '13 at 5:24
    
@Chris: Thanks for the suggestion, that could be a possible workaround. But I'd like to avoid that if possible because it's not preferable in terms of network efficiency though it might be negligible. –  K J Apr 30 '13 at 5:27
    
You can simply call this on a array consisting of zeros to obtain the keystream. Then xor it manually into your message. –  CodesInChaos Apr 30 '13 at 10:34
    
Java SE doesn't have this problem as it doesn't support AES128/CTR/NoPadding at all, at least with the default provider. I've just tried, Java 7 Oracle (but maybe my installation got mixed up and I'm using OpenJDK, everything's possible). –  maaartinus Oct 13 '14 at 7:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I just tested AES in CTR mode using Oracle Java 1.7 and I can not verify your observations:

Cipher c = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CTR/NoPadding");
KeyGenerator kg = KeyGenerator.getInstance("AES");
c.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, kg.generateKey());
System.out.println(c.update(new byte[1]).length);  // output: 1
System.out.println(c.update(new byte[20]).length); // output: 20

May be you use a defect third party implementation because "AES128/CTR/NoPadding" is not a known cipher on my system.

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You're right, it was the problem of the Android Dalvik VM, not Java SE. –  K J May 1 '13 at 6:13

I had exactly the same problem today and got it fixed just now.

The problem is your provider, which is probably Bouncy Castle. When you call getInstance(), simply provide the name of your algorithm (which in my case is "AES/CTR/NoPadding"). DO NOT specify the provider.

Let the code explain itself:

As @Robert said, the following code works correctly:

Cipher c = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CTR/NoPadding");
KeyGenerator kg = KeyGenerator.getInstance("AES");
c.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, kg.generateKey());
System.out.println(c.update(new byte[1]).length);  // output: 1
System.out.println(c.update(new byte[20]).length); // output: 20

However, if you specify the provider as "BC" instead, it will be wrong:

Cipher c = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CTR/NoPadding", "BC");
KeyGenerator kg = KeyGenerator.getInstance("AES");
c.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, kg.generateKey());
System.out.println(c.update(new byte[20]).length); // output: 16
System.out.println(c.update(new byte[1]).length);  // null pointer exception

It could be considered as a bug of Bouncy Castle, or a kind of (weird but reasonable) feature.

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1  
In my case Android Dalvik was the problem, but thanks for pointing out that a custom provider also has the same problem. –  K J May 1 '13 at 6:19
    
Thanks for letting me know that Android has same problem (feature?). This is annoying since a benefit of counter mode is that it can be used without padding. –  monnand May 6 '13 at 22:39

I've not had to solve this problem myself, but one workaround would be to produce the key stream manually and handle the XORing yourself.

That is, you would switch from AES/CTR/NoPadding to AES/ECB/NoPadding and repeatedly encrypt your incrementing counter value, whenever you need fresh data to XOR with the ciphertext.

Far from ideal, but I suppose it would work.

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Thanks for the suggestion. I think I can use CTR with an array of zeroes to get the keystream. –  K J May 1 '13 at 6:17

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