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I have a matrix number of observations, and number of matrix and I would like to remove all zeros columns, then I tried using nearZeroVar(dataset).

removeColumns <-nearZeroVar(datset) # remove zeros
testT <- datset[, -removeColumns]

But then there is another way which is

removeZeros <- apply(dataset, 2, function(x) length(unique(x)) == 1)

dataset<- datset[, !removeZeros];

it gives me the same result in small vector ,

    mdat <- matrix(c(1,2,3,0,4,5, 0,0,0,0, 0,0,3,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,2,3,0), nrow = 6, ncol = 4, byrow = TRUE)
"
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    2    3    0
[2,]    4    5    0    0
[3,]    0    0    0    0
[4,]    3    0    0    0
[5,]    0    0    0    0
[6,]    1    2    3    0
"
cols_mdat <-nearZeroVar(mdat)
"4"

mdat_remove <-mdat[,-cols_mdat]


"[,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    2    3
[2,]    4    5    0
[3,]    0    0    0
[4,]    3    0    0
[5,]    0    0    0
[6,]    1    2    3
"

mdatzv <- apply(mdat, 2, function(x) length(unique(x)) == 1);
mdat_nzv <- mdat[, !mdatzv];
"
 [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    2    3
[2,]    4    5    0
[3,]    0    0    0
[4,]    3    0    0
[5,]    0    0    0
[6,]    1    2    3
"

But in my dataset where there are 785 features and around 4200 observations ,it returns different number of features.

Would you please tell me what is the difference between these two ways ?

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Read the help for nearZeroVar It explains this clearly. –  mnel Apr 30 '13 at 6:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The second example is just removing columns where there is one unique value in that column. Consider this:

mdat <- matrix(c(100,100,100,100,100,100, 0,0,0,0, 0,0,3,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,2,3,0), nrow = 6, ncol = 4, byrow = FALSE)
mdat
#    [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
#[1,]  100    0    3    0
#[2,]  100    0    0    0
#[3,]  100    0    0    1
#[4,]  100    0    0    2
#[5,]  100    0    0    3
#[6,]  100    0    0    0


mdat[ , !apply(mdat, 2, function(x) length(unique(x)) == 1) ]
#    [,1] [,2]
#[1,]    3    0
#[2,]    0    0
#[3,]    0    1
#[4,]    0    2
#[5,]    0    3
#[6,]    0    0

It doesn't matter if the value is close to zero or not, if there is only one unique value in the column, the logical comparison == returns TRUE and the ! operator means we exclude that column.

nearZeroVar on the other hand removes columns with unique values, but also columns that have very few unique values relative to the total number of observations, and where the ratio of the most common value to next most common value is large (i.e. highly overdispersed). Now consider the same data, but if we set the ratio of the most common value to next most common low enough and the cutoff for the percentage of unique values out of total number of sample high enough then those columns will also be selected:

nearZeroVar( mdat , freqCut = 4 , uniqueCut = 40 ) 
#[1] 1 2 3

Columns 1 & 3 get selected because they contain 1 value. Column two gets selected because the ratio of most column values ( 0 ) to next most common (3) is 5:1, which is greater than the cutoff of 4, and the percentage of the number of unique values in the column (2 values, 0 and 3) over the total number of observations (6 rows) is 2/6*100 is 33% which is < the 40% we specified for unique cut.

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