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I have an implementation of a Maybe / Option class in c#. Basic implementation is

public delegate Maybe<TOutput> Converter<in TInput, out TOutput>(TInput input);
public delegate TOutput ElseDelegate<out TOutput>();
public delegate Maybe<TOutput> ElseDelegate2<out TOutput>();

public interface Maybe<out TResult> : IEnumerable<TResult>
{
    Maybe<B> Bind<B>(Converter<TResult, B> f);
    TResult Value();
    bool IsSome();
}

public static class Maybe
{
    public static Maybe<T> None<T>()
    {
        return new None<T>();
    }
}

public interface INone<out TResult> : Maybe<TResult>
{
}

public interface ISome<out TResult> : Maybe<TResult>
{
}

public struct None<TResult> : INone<TResult>
{

    public IEnumerator<TResult> GetEnumerator()
    { yield break; }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    { yield break; }


    public bool IsSome() { return false; }

    public Maybe<TOutput> Bind<TOutput>(Converter<TResult, TOutput> f)
    {
        return new None<TOutput>();
    }

    public TResult Value()
    {
        throw new IndexOutOfRangeException("None has no value");
    }
}

public struct Some<TResult> : Maybe<TResult>
{
    private TResult _Value;
    public Some(TResult value)
    {
        _Value = value;
    }

    public IEnumerator<TResult> GetEnumerator()
    { yield return _Value; }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    { yield return _Value; }

    public bool IsSome() { return true; }

    public Maybe<TOutput> Bind<TOutput>(Converter<TResult, TOutput> f)
    {
        return f(_Value);
    }

    public TResult Value()
    {
        return this._Value;
    }
}
#endregion

with a bunch of extension methods I have not included here. This all works fine. However a standard pattern I would like to implement is below, using Maybe to implement optional parameter defaults as in F#

void DoSomeCalc
    ( Maybe<double> x = Maybe.None<double>()
    , Maybe<double> y = Maybe.None<double>()
    )
{
    this.X = x.Else( ()=> CalculateDefaultX() );
    this.Y = y.Else( ()=> CalculateDefaultY() );
}

so I can do

DoSomeCalc(x:10)

or

DoSomeCalc(y:20)

where Else provides a value if None is available. However this is all nice in theorey but C# optional parameters must be compile time constants which completely screws this pattern.

Can anybody suggest a fix that will keep the intent of the pattern without introducing nullables or nulls here?

Is there anyway I can create a compile time constant to represent None here that will work with my above implementation of Maybe?

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Josh Mein, Karl-Johan Sjögren, Devolus, Ondrej Janacek Dec 22 '13 at 8:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Sounds like Dynamic to me... –  Fendy Apr 30 '13 at 6:19
    
Nothing to do with dynamic. Maybe is statically typed. –  bradgonesurfing Apr 30 '13 at 6:20
    
params Maybe<double>[] args maybe? –  Corak Apr 30 '13 at 6:32
1  
Why are you trying to reimplement Nullable<T>? –  svick Apr 30 '13 at 15:37
1  
@svick: Good humor. –  Ken Kin Apr 30 '13 at 15:40

2 Answers 2

No, there's nothing you can do here. Your parameter type is a reference type, which means the only constant values available are null and string literals. (Obviously string literals aren't useful in your case; I only mention them as the only kind of non-null reference type constant.)

One option would be to make Maybe<T> a struct instead of an interface, with the default value the "none" value. This would then be basically the same as Nullable<T> but without the constraint that T had to be a non-nullable value type. You could then use:

void DoSomeCalc(Maybe<double> x = default(Maybe<double>),
                Maybe<double> y = default(Maybe<double>))

Sample code showing all of this:

using System;

struct Maybe<T>
{
    private readonly bool hasValue;
    public bool HasValue { get { return hasValue; } }

    private readonly T value;
    public T Value
    {
        get
        {
            if (!hasValue)
            {
                throw new InvalidOperationException();
            }
            return value;
        }
    }

    public Maybe(T value)
    {
        this.hasValue = true;
        this.value = value;
    }

    public static implicit operator Maybe<T>(T value)
    {
        return new Maybe<T>(value);
    }
}

class Test
{
    static void DoSomeCalc(Maybe<double> x = default(Maybe<double>),
                           Maybe<double> y = default(Maybe<double>))
    {
        Console.WriteLine(x.HasValue ? "x = " + x.Value : "No x");
        Console.WriteLine(y.HasValue ? "y = " + y.Value : "No y");
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("First call");
        DoSomeCalc(x: 10);

        Console.WriteLine("Second call");
        DoSomeCalc(y: 20);
    }
}

Obviously you'd want to add more functionality to Maybe<T>, such as overriding ToString and Equals, but you get the general idea. You can still have a non-generic Maybe class with factory methods too, of course.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately Maybe<T> has to stay an interface to enable covariance on T. Damn c# Can only have covariance on interfaces. No implicit conversions to interfaces and now this compile time constant stuff. :(. However this post seems to claim the impossible. abdullin.com/journal/2009/10/6/… scroll down to Reason 5: Initialization of Immutable classes –  bradgonesurfing Apr 30 '13 at 13:50
    
@bradgonesurfing: Yup, that looks like it shouldn't compile. I don't have time to check the article right now, but is there a download link? I suspect the author just wrote code that he expected would work, but without trying it. –  Jon Skeet Apr 30 '13 at 13:54
    
I couldn't see a download link but I'm guessing you are right and he didn't try it. –  bradgonesurfing Apr 30 '13 at 13:55
    
@bradgonesurfing: The fact that it was written in October 2009 and VS2010 didn't come out until April 2010 means that at least he didn't test it against a final release. I don't think there was a pre-release version of the C# 4 compiler which allowed non-compile-time-constant values for optional parameters but just maybe there was. –  Jon Skeet Apr 30 '13 at 14:16
    
The correct answer for question of these heavy restrictions. –  Ken Kin Apr 30 '13 at 15:33

You can use null internally to mean Maybe.None<double>(). E.g.:

double DoSomeCalc
    ( Maybe<double> x = null
    , Maybe<double> y = null
    )
{
    x = x ?? Maybe.None<double>();
    y = y ?? Maybe.None<double>();
    this.X = x.Else( ()=> CalculateDefaultX() );
    this.Y = y.Else( ()=> CalculateDefaultY() );
}

It is not ideal as you have to document somewhere in comments that passing null means "use a particular default".

share|improve this answer
    
Defeats the purpose of using Maybe doesn't it? I can just use nullable in this case. –  bradgonesurfing Apr 30 '13 at 7:18
    
Depending on what's the purpose of Maybe. There is a difference between passing null and passing an instance of nullable with no value. nullable is a struct (value type) and so you really can't pass a null instead. C# compiler will convert the null into the proper constructor of nullable<T>. In your case you are passing a reference type (interface), which means passing null is actually valid and it's up to you to define what null Maybe<T> means. Your implementation of Maybe gives you more than the nullable type in C#. –  Palo Apr 30 '13 at 7:39
    
Maybe.None means I don't want to pass anything. It has different semantics to actually passing null. –  bradgonesurfing Apr 30 '13 at 7:39
    
So what does passing null mean? Isn't it the same as "I don't want to pass anything"? –  Palo Apr 30 '13 at 7:40
    
I want to differentiate between a caller actually not including a parameter in the call at compile time and accidentally passing in a null reference. –  bradgonesurfing Apr 30 '13 at 7:41

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