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<html>
<script language="javascript"> 
today = new Date(); 
document.write("<BR>The time now is: ", today.getHours(),":",today.getMinutes(),":",today.getSeconds()); 
document.write("<BR>The date is: ", today.getDate(),"/",today.getMonth()+1,"/",today.getYear()); 
</script> 
</html>

I'd like to autorefresh the page to show the change in the seconds. How to do it? Please help me.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all, you probably shouldn't use document.write(). It is mostly considered bad practice. You'd be better off using a container element in your HTML (e.g. a <div>). You can then set the innerHTML of this <div>.

Next up, you don't have to refresh the page every single second. Use a setInterval() function. It accepts a function and an interval that lets you set after what time the given function should be running again.

In your HTML, all you need is a <div> element.

<div id="time"></div>

In your JavaScript, define a function that writes the current date into the container element and use setInterval to call it every second (1000ms).

var time = document.getElementById('time');

function writeDate () {
    var today = new Date();
    time.innerHTML = "The time now is: " + today.getHours() +":" + today.getMinutes() + ":" + today.getSeconds();
    time.innerHTML += "<br>The date is: " + today.getDate() + "/" + (today.getMonth() + 1) + "/" + today.getFullYear();
}

setInterval(writeDate, 1000);

You can see it in action in this jSFiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
Huh. We pretty much got the same answer... –  Zyrius Apr 30 '13 at 6:43
    
@Derija93 Obviously, yes. However, when I posted mine, yours wasn't at the level of detail it is now. –  Sacha Apr 30 '13 at 6:46
    
Well that was a mistake. I managed to hit Tab + Enter while editing the code and it posted the answer. That was really awkward... –  Zyrius May 2 '13 at 21:10

Auto-refreshing here isn't a good idea. There are better approaches. However, if you insist, use:

window.location.reload();

A better way would be to wrap that in a function and call window.setInterval or window.setTimeout on it. Note that setInterval registers a recurring timer while setTimeout will call the registered function only once. Change your code like this:

<head>
<script language="text/javascript">
function doIt() {
    var today = new Date();
    document.getElementById("output").innerHTML = "The time now is: " +
        today.getHours() + ":" + today.getMinutes() + ":" + today.getSeconds() + 
        "<br />The date is: " + today.getDate() + "/" + ( today.getMonth() + 1 ) +
        "/" + today.getYear();
}
window.setInterval(doIt, 1000);
// Alternatively you can use:
//window.setInterval("doIt()", 1000); // This is what you usually learn first...
</script>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="output"></div>
</body>
share|improve this answer

Try This (Note you should use getFullYear instead of getYear):

<html>
    <head>
        <title>Date Time</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id = 'time'><div>
        <script language="javascript">
            function getCurrentTime()
            {
                var today = new Date();
                var hours = today.getHours();
                if (hours <= 9){
                    hours = '0' + hours;
                }
                var minutes = today.getMinutes();
                if (minutes <= 9){
                    minutes = '0' + minutes;
                }
                var seconds = today.getSeconds();
                if (seconds <= 9){
                    seconds = '0' + seconds;
                }
                return hours + ":" + minutes + ":" + seconds;
            }

            function getCurrentDate()
            {
                var today = new Date();
                var days = today.getDate();
                if (days <= 9){
                    days = '0' + days;
                }
                var months = today.getMonth() + 1;
                if (months <= 9){
                    months = '0' + months;
                }
                var years = today.getFullYear();
                if (years <= 9){
                    years = '0' + years;
                }
                return days + "/" + months + "/" + years;
            }

            function updateDateTime()
            {
                document.getElementById('time').innerHTML = '<br />The time now is: ' + getCurrentTime() +
                                                            '<br />The date is: ' + getCurrentDate();
                setTimeout(updateDateTime, 1000);
            }

            updateDateTime();
        </script>
    </body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Out of curiosity, why not use setInterval instead of calling setTimeout over and over again? –  Sacha Apr 30 '13 at 6:51
1  
With setTimeout you will never get two instances running at the same time in the case one of them take too long to run. –  Hermann Stephane Ntsamo Apr 30 '13 at 7:00

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