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Sorry, yet another question regarding the TestFirst.org Ruby exercise to write a 'Pig Latin' method, coming from a newbie. The other answers helped somewhat but I wasn't able to adapt them successfully. The main issue is that I'm trying to write a method to scan through a string of words (not just a single word), modify some of the words (if applicable), then return the full string back.

Below is my code attempting to perform the first part of the exercise, which is to append "ay" to any word beginning with a vowel. However, it is not working for me -- seems the .include? never returns true from comparing with a single letter(?)

Any help is much appreciated!

# PIG LATIN
# If any word within the input string begins with a vowel, add an "ay" to the end of the word

def translate(string)

  vowels_array = %w{a e i o u y}
  consonants_array = ('a'..'z').to_a - vowels_array

  string_array = string.split

  string_array.each do |word|
    if vowels_array.include?(word[0])
      word + 'ay'
    end
  end

  return string_array.join(" ")

end 

translate("apple orange mango")    # => "appleay orangeay mango" but does not
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

string_array.each just iterates through string_array, doesn't change it; in order to update the contents of an array you should use map!:

  # ...
  string_array.map! do |word|
    if vowels_array.include?(word[0])
      word + 'ay'
    else
      word
    end
  end
  # ...

translate("apple orange mango")    #=> "appleay orangeay mango"

The purpose of else word end is to return the word also when the if condition is not satisfied.


Out of the array manipulating point of view, in most cases the best way to manipulate strings are regexps:

def translate(string)
  string.gsub(/(^|\s)[aeiouy]\S*/i, '\0ay')
end

translate("apple orange mango") #=> "appleay orangeay mango"
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@user2316803 If you wanted to use an Array though you have to have an temp array that you push the modified object into. –  limelights Apr 30 '13 at 7:41
    
@ProGNOMmers: Ah, understand -- thanks! (Your above code still wouldn't return the modified string in Ruby 1.8 console on Cadecademy, but works fine when I execute with Ruby 2.0 in cmd). The RegEx alternative is too much to digest for me for now but I get the concept. Thanks again! –  pete Apr 30 '13 at 15:11
    
regexps are tricky at the beginning, but they become trivial when you get use to them. You're welcome ;-) –  mdesantis Apr 30 '13 at 18:20
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Hash key lookup may be a bit faster

v= Hash['a', 1, 'o', '1', 'i', 1, 'u', 1, 'e', 1]
ws= %w(apple orange mango)
ws.map! do |w|
  v[w[0]].nil? ? w : "#{w}ay"
end
p ws
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Sounds like a job for a regular expression:

str = 'apple orange mango'

str.gsub(/\b[aeiou]\w*\b/, '\0ay')
#=> "appleay orangeay mango"

gsub will look for all occurences of a pattern (the first argument) and replace it with a string (the second argument). Inside that string, you can refer back to the matched pattern with \0 and append ay to it, which leaves us with \0ay.

Now the pattern (the actual regular expression) means “Capture whole words (\b matches word boundaries), that start with one of [aeiou] and end with zero ore more word characters (\w*)”.

So your complete method can be boiled down to:

def translate(string)
  string.gsub /\b[aeiou]\w*\b/, '\0ay'
end 

Et voilá!

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@paddle: Thanks for the thorough explanation. Awesome one-line solution -- it sure works. Need to learn more on regexs! –  pete Apr 30 '13 at 15:21
    
Glad you like it! Perhaps consider showing your appreciation with an upvote then :) Regexes are really powerful, but they can also get messy, so one has to use them with care. –  p11y Apr 30 '13 at 17:00
    
@paddle: I tried but don't have enough rep to do so yet. About to post another Q, so will reciprocate soon ;) –  pete May 1 '13 at 2:46
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Try:

def translate(string)     
  new_string = ''
  string.split.each do |word|
    if 'aoiue'.include?(word[0])
      new_string += word + 'ay '
    else
      new_string += word + ' '
    end
  end
  return new_string.strip
end 

> translate("apple orange mango")
=> "appleay orangeay mango" 
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Great, this works too (even under Ruby 1.8) and is pretty clear to decipher. The only issue is that we end up with an extra space at the end of the string, but 'return new_string.chop' takes care of that. Thanks! –  pete Apr 30 '13 at 15:15
    
Thanks @user2316803 –  shweta May 2 '13 at 5:27
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