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I have a file that has this basic format:

>> (N0) "string X0"
...
>> (N1) "string X1"
...
<< (N1+2) "string X1"
...
<< (N0+2) "string X0"

As you can see it is a nested construct. There are no parenthesis around the number N0, N1, N*. These can be nested as deep as whatever. The string is within quotes but they are not numbered, just the same. And a nested string can be the same as an outer string.

I was going to make a macro to try an indent all of these nested items to make it easier to analyze the data, but I'm not sure how to search for N+2.

If I can't do it in vim, I'll just have to write a perl script I guess, but was wondering if it could be done in vim.

I've added here a more concrete example of input and output, though this data set doesn't matter any more, I'm more interested in finding out how to find the next occurrence of a found number incremented by 2:

>> 5 "foo"
...
>> 2 "bar"
...
<< 4 "bar"
...
<< 7 "foo"
>> 5 "foo"
  ...
  >> 2 "bar"
   ...
  << 4 "bar"
  ...
<< 7 "foo"

So basically, I want to find a number, say 5 and then find the next occurrence of 5+2, i.e. 7. I would then be able to indent the lines in between.

Any ideas? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
The perl script was easier then I expected due to my >> and << flags that I had put in. However, I would still be interested in knowing how to search for a value + 2. –  Adrian Apr 30 '13 at 8:07
2  
from the description, I didn't understand your requirement very clearly. you want to find (Nx+2) ? can you make an example as original text, and an expected output? –  Kent Apr 30 '13 at 8:22
    
Hope the example clears things up for you. –  Adrian Apr 30 '13 at 12:04
    
It seems to me that you need to keep a pile with the last value visited (for instance, begin with 5 and then push the 2 on top of it). As you push values into the pile you keep increasing the indentation level until the current value satisfies the condition <top of pile> + 2 (when you decrease the indentation level and pop out the top of the pile). The logic is simple (and I believe you already understand that), but I'm afraid there is no way of keeping that pile across multiple calls to indentexpr. –  freitass Apr 30 '13 at 12:23
    
Yeah, I don't know much of the API for vim. I was going to do it more macro style. That was the reason why I was asking about doing a search for a number + 2. BTW, how did I get -2 for this post? It only shows -1, and I think I clarified it so I don't think I deserve that either. –  Adrian Apr 30 '13 at 14:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

from your example, I noticed that your >> and << are paired. So I assume that in each pair,

closing number = starting number +2

I just didn't check the number. just calculate the indent by << and >>, see if it meets your need.

first source this function:

fun! GetIndent(line_num)

    let lnum = a:line_num
    if lnum == 0
        return 0
    endif
    let sp = '^\s*>> \d'
    let ep = '^\s*<< \d'
    let l = getline(a:line_num)
    if l =~ sp    
        while lnum > 0
            let lnum = prevnonblank(lnum-1)
            if getline(lnum) =~ sp
                return indent(lnum)+&tabstop
                break
            endif
        endwhile    
    endif

    if l =~ ep
        while lnum > 0
            let lnum = prevnonblank(lnum-1)
            if getline(lnum) =~ sp
                return indent(lnum) 
                break
            endif

            if getline(lnum) =~ ep
                return indent(lnum) -&tabstop
                break
            endif
        endwhile    
    endif
    return indent(a:line_num - 1)
endf

then in the buffer of your file, execute:

:setlocal indentexpr=GetIndent(v:lnum)

now, you could use gg=G to format your text. for example:

this

>> 1 "foo"
...
>> 2 "bar"
...
>> 3 "bar"
...
>> 4 "bar"
...
>> 5 "bar"
...
>> 6 "bar"
...
<< 6 "bar"
...
<< 5 "bar"
...
<< 4 "bar"
...
<< 3 "bar"
...
<< 2 "bar"
...
<< 1 "foo"

after gg=G will become:

>> 1 "foo"
...
    >> 2 "bar"
    ...
        >> 3 "bar"
        ...
            >> 4 "bar"
            ...
                >> 5 "bar"
                ...
                    >> 6 "bar"
                    ...
                    << 6 "bar"
                    ...
                << 5 "bar"
                ...
            << 4 "bar"
            ...
        << 3 "bar"
        ...
    << 2 "bar"
    ...
<< 1 "foo"  

as I said, I didn't check the number in your text. I used number 1-6 for both starting and closing pair just for showing the indent in a clear way. It could be 1-3, 2-4, 3-5 .... If my function doesn't do what you want, and checking the number+2 is required. you could from the matched line extract the number and do checking. My function should get you start.

Good luck!

regex is not the right way to do math calculation. basically speaking, regex (alone) cannot do it. – Kent May 6 at 9:29

share|improve this answer
    
This is basically what I did in perl. And this is great intro to how to programme in vim. Thanks for that. However it doesn't address what the question is. –  Adrian May 2 '13 at 22:49
    
@Adrian if >> and << are always paired, and they are always following the n+2 rule, my answer worked for you. If not in that case, there are many cases need to be clarified. e.g. what if two n+2 ranges are not nested, but crossing each other? how do you do the indent? anyway, if the rule is well defined, my function should get you start, like I said in answer. since you could take the number out by regex. In fact I had almost done it, only the group (..) was missing. again, Good luck! –  Kent May 2 '13 at 23:01
    
I was looking for a vim regex that would be able to find ">> n" and "<< n+2". Yes, your answer gets to then final product, but this is an exercise in trying to find a way to find the n+2 without code, just a regex, if it is even possible. –  Adrian May 6 '13 at 2:38
    
regex is not the right way to do math calculation. basically speaking, regex (alone) cannot do it. –  Kent May 6 '13 at 9:29
    
That's what I wanted to know. Thanks. –  Adrian May 7 '13 at 20:21

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