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I got some php code here:

<?php
echo 'hello ' . 1 + 2 . '34';
?> 

which outputs 234,

but when I add a number 11 before "hello":

<?php
echo '11hello ' . 1 + 2 . '34';
?> 

It outputs 1334 rather than 245(which I expected it to), why is that?

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Why isn't any answer accepted?@JetLaggy seems to be new...accept a answer so that the thread would be closed and answerer gain some reputation! ;) :) –  coderunner Apr 30 '13 at 12:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

That's strange...

But

<?php
echo '11hello ' . (1 + 2) . '34';
?>

OR

<?php
echo '11hello ', 1 + 2, '34';
?>

fixing issue.


UPDv1:

Finally managed to get proper answer:

'hello' = 0 (contains no leading digits, so PHP assumes it is zero).

So 'hello' . 1 + 2 simplifies to 'hello1' + 2 is 2, because no leading digits in 'hello1' is zero too.


'11hello ' = 11 (contains leading digits, so PHP assumes it is eleven).

So '11hello ' . 1 + 2 simplifies to '11hello 1' + 2 as 11 + 2 is 13.


UPDv2:

http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.types.string.php

The value is given by the initial portion of the string. If the string starts with valid numeric data, this will be the value used. Otherwise, the value will be 0 (zero). Valid numeric data is an optional sign, followed by one or more digits (optionally containing a decimal point), followed by an optional exponent. The exponent is an 'e' or 'E' followed by one or more digits.

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Hi,man. thanks for the quick reply. 245 is what I expected it to output, but it showed 1334. I just don't understand why the precedence changed if I add number before hello string. –  JetLaggy Apr 30 '13 at 7:56
    
PHP very like to convert everything to numbers. Read here. –  Num6 Apr 30 '13 at 7:58
    
@JetLaggy , updated. Consider. –  Num6 Apr 30 '13 at 8:15
    
+1. Very thorough answer. –  ɴ ᴀ ᴛ ʜ Apr 30 '13 at 8:39
    
@CORRUPT Thanks a lot! A complete answer and easy to understand. Cheers~ –  JetLaggy Apr 30 '13 at 11:52

you have to use () in mathematical operation

echo 'hello ' . (1 + 2) . '34'; // output hello334
echo '11hello ' . (1 + 2) . '34'; // output 11hello334
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Still, it does not explains why php ignores concat operator and typecast string to int while concating. Acting as sum, but not as concat. –  Num6 Apr 30 '13 at 7:55

The dot operator has the same precedence as + and -, which can yield unexpected results.

That technically answers your question... if you want numbers to be treated as numbers during concatination just wrap them in parenthesis.

<?php
echo '11hello ' . (1 + 2) . '34';
?>
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+1. Explains almost everything here. –  Num6 Apr 30 '13 at 8:01
    
Cheers, this helps. I really should just stick to php manual. coz the one that I read earlier says concatenation has higher precedence than addition.... what a shame...... –  JetLaggy Apr 30 '13 at 8:03

If you hate putting operators in between assign them to vaiable

$var = 1 + 2;

echo 'hello ' . $var . '34';
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You should check PHP type conversion table to get better idea what's happen behind the scenes: http://php.net/manual/en/types.comparisons.php

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thanks, manual rocks!! –  JetLaggy Apr 30 '13 at 8:03

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