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I got some code like:

setA :: Integer -> Integer
setA 3 = 5
setA 5 = 6
setA 7 = error "some error one"
setA _ = error "some error two"

now I try to write another function

checkError :: Integer -> Bool
checkError x = if HERE_TO_CHECK_IF setA x RETURNS some error two
                then False
                else True

but how can I do this?

Thanks

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What did you want to do using checkError? What are you supposed to use setA for? Maybe there's a way of doing what you need, but we don't know the big picture. –  AndrewC Apr 30 '13 at 10:14
1  
Whitebox checking, checkError x = even x || x < 3 || x > 7 is forbidden? –  Daniel Fischer Apr 30 '13 at 11:17
    
nop @DanielFischer :) I did something like this, but the Integers are different, the complete function also. I was not allowed to post the same functions, maybe our profs are searchin everwhere if we used some other codes ;) i really have rewritten my version.. Now it is working.. –  ahmet2106 May 1 '13 at 10:20

4 Answers 4

As said already in the other answers, you should avoid using error and instead use

setA :: Integer -> Either String Integer
setA 3 = Right 5
setA 5 = Right 6
setA 7 = Left "some error one"
setA _ = Left "some error two"

checkError :: Either String Integer -> Bool
checkError (Left _)  = False
checkError (Right _) = True

But if you can't do this, look at the source code to the spoon package to see how to do what your professor is asking for. It's icky.

Then you can say

checkError :: Integer -> Bool
checkError x = case teaspoon x of
    Nothing -> False
    Just _  -> True
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As I understand it, the error call is not meant to be caught by the caller – if you want the error to be recoverable, the setA function should use some other mechanism (like Either). If you insist on catching the error, you may do so inside the IO monad, see this related question.

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but we are not allowed to change setA, but i need a function which checks, if x is 3,5,7 (only not the second error is allowed in setA, everything else shoudl return true) –  ahmet2106 Apr 30 '13 at 9:15
    
Did you read the linked question, especially the answer about Control.Exception and spoon? –  zoul Apr 30 '13 at 9:24

Your setA function is incorrect. If you expect a function to be able to return erroneous values, you should use Either:

setA :: Integer -> Either String Integer
setA 3 = Right 5
setA 5 = Right 6
setA 7 = Left "some error one"
setA _ = Left "some error two"

Checking for the error is trivial:

checkError :: Either String Integer -> Bool
checkError = either (const True) (const False)
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i am not able to change setA, this is set by default (at university we are not allowed to change setA, only the other one :)) –  ahmet2106 Apr 30 '13 at 8:59
    
@ahmet2106 You can tell your professor to go ... check his qualification then. This question will explain why. –  Nikita Volkov Apr 30 '13 at 9:04
4  
I think the requirement might be sensible. After the students are through the pain of catching the error in the IO monad you can say that this method of error handling is obviously too cumbersome and come up with a better interface. –  zoul Apr 30 '13 at 9:11

Although error should only be used for unrecoverable bad state (so no need to be catched), here is an exact example that catches error calls

but I think that this is not the way except for writing debuggers:

{-# LANGUAGE ScopedTypeVariables #-}
import Prelude hiding (catch)
import Control.Exception

setA :: Integer -> Integer
setA 3 = 5
setA 5 = 6
setA 7 = error "some error one"
setA _ = error "some error two"

main = do
  (print $ setA 9)
  `catch` (\(ErrorCall msg) -> putStrLn $ "I caught you, ErrorCall: " ++ msg)
  `catch` (\(exc::SomeException) -> putStrLn $ "Other exception: " ++ show exc)

For normal programming, wrap possible erroneous results with the type Either, as the other answers explain.

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