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In class, we were given a simple loop we were supposed to vectorize. This went well enough, but we came across a curious thing. Consider this code:

#include<stdio.h>

void func(int N, double *a, double *b, double *c, double *d) {
  int i;
  #pragma ivdep
  for ( i=0; i<N; i++ ) {
    d[i] = c[i+1];
  }
  #pragma ivdep
  for ( i=0; i<N; i++ ) {
    a[i] = b[i];
    c[i] = a[i] + b[i];
  }
}

This is the output of ICC (command icc -O2 -vec-report3 -c example.c, version 13.0.1):

example.c(6): (col. 3) remark: LOOP WAS VECTORIZED.
example.c(6): (col. 3) remark: loop was not vectorized: not inner loop.
example.c(10): (col. 3) remark: LOOP WAS VECTORIZED.

I am not fluent enough in assembler to read the -S dump so I don't know what it actually did; but since there is no reason I can fathom not to vectorise the first loop, I assume it does.

What is the reason for these contradicting messages?

On the open side of things, GCC 4.5.4 (command gcc -O3 -ftree-vectorizer-verbose=1 -c example.c) vectorizes both loops. GCC 4.6.4, on the other hand, prints this:

example.c:10: note: created 3 versioning for alias checks.
example.c:10: note: LOOP VECTORIZED.
example.c:3: note: vectorized 1 loops in function.

GCC 4.8.0 is even more verbose:

Analyzing loop at example.c:10
Vectorizing loop at example.c:10
example.c:10: note: create runtime check for data references *_24 and *_21
example.c:10: note: create runtime check for data references *_24 and *_27
example.c:10: note: create runtime check for data references *_21 and *_27
example.c:10: note: created 3 versioning for alias checks.
example.c:10: note: === vect_do_peeling_for_loop_bound ===Setting upper bound of nb iterations for epilogue loop to 0
example.c:10: note: LOOP VECTORIZED.
Analyzing loop at example.c:6
example.c:3: note: vectorized 1 loops in function.
example.c:10: note: Turned loop into non-loop; it never loops.

Both do not say anything of note about the first loop, but 4.8.0 seems to contradict itself on the second.

What is going on here?

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2 Answers 2

I think that what happens is that the first loop is simple enough that the compiler has already a vectorized version on hand, so instead of generating vectorized code, it replaces to a call to that already optimized version (which hopefully contains an alias check already).

As to the second loop, since they may be aliases between the pointers (you can tell if there is no alias with restrict pointers: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restrict ) it needs to do some runtime checks to ensure that there are no aliases. Depending on the aliases, different vectorized version of the second loop may apply.

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If you remove the #pragma ivdep and introduce restrict pointers as shown below, you see the same behavior from icc and gcc:

#include<stdio.h>

void func(int N, double *__restrict__ a, double *__restrict__ b, double *__restrict__ c, double *__restrict__ d) {
  int i;
  for ( i=0; i<N; i++ ) {
    d[i] = c[i+1];
  }
  for ( i=0; i<N; i++ ) {
    a[i] = b[i];
    c[i] = a[i] + b[i];
  }
}

The vectorization report from icc is:

$ icc -c test.cc -vec-report2
test.cc(5): (col. 3) remark: LOOP WAS VECTORIZED
test.cc(5): (col. 3) remark: loop was not vectorized: not inner loop
test.cc(8): (col. 3) remark: LOOP WAS VECTORIZED

The vectorization report from gcc is:

$ gcc -c -O3 -ftree-vectorizer-verbose=1 test.cc

test.cc:8: note: LOOP VECTORIZED.
test.cc:5: note: LOOP VECTORIZED.
test.cc:3: note: vectorized 2 loops in function.

The gcc version used here is 4.4.4. By specifying restrict keyword, we memory aliasing check is ignored by both icc and gcc.

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Maybe I'm missing something, but how does that answer my question? –  Raphael May 7 at 21:51

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