Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

When I query my table for a specific object like this, I'll get an empty result set:

SELECT 
   a, b, c, valid_to, pk_mykey, myobject
FROM
   myschema.mytable
WHERE
   valid_to = to_date('31.12.9999 23:59:59', 'dd.mm.yyyy hh24:mi:ss')
AND
   pk_mykey > 0
AND
   myobject = 'ABC.123';

But I know the record has to be in the table!

So I use this query and it will suddenly show up:

SELECT 
   /*+ NO_INDEX(mytable myindex) */
   a, b, c, valid_to, pk_mykey, myobject
FROM
   myschema.mytable
WHERE
   valid_to = to_date('31.12.9999 23:59:59', 'dd.mm.yyyy hh24:mi:ss')
AND
   pk_mykey > 0
AND
   myobject = 'ABC.123';

So by using the index the records won't show, but without index it will? How is this possible? What am I missing here? What is wrong with my table and/or my index? Any idea how I can solve this?

(DBMS is Oracle 11g EE 11.2.0.2.0 64bit)

share|improve this question
    
what is the diff b/w the 2 queries? – ling.s Apr 30 '13 at 9:19
    
@ling.s: the NO_INDEX hint – a_horse_with_no_name Apr 30 '13 at 9:30
    
@ling.s: yes, exactly what a_horse_with_no_name said, the hint. query1 gives me no record at all. query2 exactly 1 record (as it is supposed to be) where myobject = 'ABC.123' and the other conditions apply – BaseBallBatBoy Apr 30 '13 at 10:00
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Have you confirmed that there is a difference in the execution plan?

If you are getting different results with and without the index then I'd consider dropping the index and recreating it. Do not just rebuild the index, as the new segment will be based on the data in the old, and if you do have a corruption problem that will not fix it.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, query1 uses the index (unique scan). query2 does a full table scan, no index included. – BaseBallBatBoy Apr 30 '13 at 9:54
    
Is that an index on myobject and valid_to? – David Aldridge Apr 30 '13 at 10:39
    
exactly, a unique index on myobject and valid_to. also there is a tablespace for all indexes (myschema_idx) and a tablespace for all tables (myschema_tbl). – BaseBallBatBoy Apr 30 '13 at 10:54
    
I don't think the tablespaces are relevant, but try the index replacement if you can. – David Aldridge Apr 30 '13 at 11:11

Theoretically the content of your index can be "invalid" due to some Oracle bug. This could happen on some early RAC releases. Try to execute the statement

ALTER TABLE myschema.mytable VALIDATE STRUCTURE CASCADE;

This will "crosscheck" table content against it's indexes. Or try to rebuild the index.

share|improve this answer
1  
don't you mean ANALYZE TABLE? If so, I'm not the DBA and hence have not the privileges to run such a query... – BaseBallBatBoy Apr 30 '13 at 11:16
    
It's "alter table" its non destructive statement and can be "safely" executed even on prod systems. It just generates a lot of IO. If the crosscheck fails a dump file will be created in the udump_dest. This command does not require DBA privs, you can execute it as schema owner too. – ibre5041 Apr 30 '13 at 11:23
    
ORA-01735: invalid ALTER TABLE option – Jon Heller May 1 '13 at 22:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.