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I need to get the system locale to do a number of things, ultimately I want to translate my app using gettext. I am going to distribute it on both Linux and OSX, but I ran into problems on OSX Snow Leopard:

$ python
Python 2.5.2 (r252:60911, Jan  4 2009, 17:40:26) 
[GCC 4.3.2] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import locale
>>> locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, '')
'sv_SE.UTF-8'
>>> locale.getlocale()
('sv_SE', 'UTF8')

$ python
Python 2.6.1 (r261:67515, Jul  7 2009, 23:51:51) 
[GCC 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5646)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import locale
>>> locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, '')
'C'
>>> locale.getlocale()
(None, None)

Both systems are using Swedish languages. On Linux, the environment variable LANG is already set to "sv_SE.UTF-8". If I pass that variable to python on OSX (LANG="sv_SE.UTF-8" python instead), locale is detected nicely. But shouldn't locale.getlocale()be able to fetch whatever language the operating system has? I don't want to force users to set LANG, LC_ALL or any environment variable at all.

Output of locale command:

$ locale
LANG=
LC_COLLATE="C"
LC_CTYPE="C"
LC_MESSAGES="C"
LC_MONETARY="C"
LC_NUMERIC="C"
LC_TIME="C"
LC_ALL=
share|improve this question
    
what's your output of locale (in shell) in the same terminal window? –  u0b34a0f6ae Oct 27 '09 at 14:07
    
Added locale output to original post. –  pojo Oct 28 '09 at 8:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Odd on OSX (Smow Leopard 10.6.1) I get

$ python
Python 2.6.1 (r261:67515, Jul  7 2009, 23:51:51) 
[GCC 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5646)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.  
>>> import locale
>>> locale.getlocale()
(None, None)
>>> locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, '')
'en_GB.UTF-8'
>>> locale.getlocale()
('en_GB', 'UTF8')

Edit:

I just found this on the apple python mailing list

Basically it depends on what is set in your environment at run time (one of LANG, LANGUAGE, LC_ALL) I had LANG=en_GB.UTF-8 in my shell environment

share|improve this answer
    
Strange. In the original post I was using iTerm, but if I use Terminal.app I get an error (ValueError: unknown locale: UTF-8). The locale looks weird: 'C/UTF-8/C/C/C/C'. Maybe my system is messed up somehow, but it's a fairly fresh install of Snow Leopard. –  pojo Oct 27 '09 at 11:09
    
See my edit for why the change appears - your system is not messed up (well no more that all OSX python) - Sorry should have added this when I edited –  Mark Oct 28 '09 at 12:36
    
I saw your link now, and from what I can gather, "it can't be done" since OSX doesn't make use of LANG or LC_ALL. I was intrigued by the __CF_USER_TEXT_ENCODING variable, but it seems kind of stupid to parse that. IMO getlocale() should call the appropriate API:s and parse that for you, not rely on some environment variables. –  pojo Oct 28 '09 at 13:17

Looks like you can change locale by changing environment variable LC_ALL.

$ export LC_ALL=C
$ python
Python 2.5.1 (r251:54863, Feb  6 2009, 19:02:12) 
[GCC 4.0.1 (Apple Inc. build 5465)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import locale
>>> locale.getlocale()
(None, None)
>>> locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, "")
'C'
>>> locale.getlocale()
(None, None)    

$ export LC_ALL=en_GB.UTF-8
$ python
Python 2.5.1 (r251:54863, Feb  6 2009, 19:02:12) 
[GCC 4.0.1 (Apple Inc. build 5465)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import locale
>>> locale.getlocale()
(None, None)
>>> locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, "")
'en_GB.UTF-8'
>>> locale.getlocale()
('en_GB', 'UTF8')
share|improve this answer
    
But I don't see the point of having to set LC_ALL explicitly this way to get my application to detect language properly. –  pojo Oct 28 '09 at 8:12
    
OSX 10.6.8 your solution worked perfectly, thanks –  rdjs Sep 23 '11 at 21:03

Addmittedly a horrible hack, but I inserted this:

import platform

# ...

# XXX horrendous OS X invalid locale hack
if platform.system() == 'Darwin':
    import locale
    if locale.getlocale()[0] is None:
        locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, 'en_US.UTF-8')

at an early point in a program of mine. After that I could run my program using unmodified shell environment on all OS'es relevant to me (my program figures out the language to be used later in it's processing anyway).

share|improve this answer
    
Nice one ;) At least it gets the job done. –  pojo Jan 12 '12 at 9:17
1  
Glad I could help! –  Jacob Oscarson Jan 12 '12 at 9:58

From here: Try adding or editing the ~/.profile or ~/.bash_profile file for it to correctly export your locale settings upon initiating a new session.

export LC_ALL=en_US.UTF-8  
export LANG=en_US.UTF-8
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