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Matching the first column is no problem, but that does not help.

awk '!(x[$(1)]++)' List.txt

I want to search the file for duplicate mac addresses, last 6 columns (or 1?). If a match is found print remove the match.

 q-r20 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.31 = Hex-STRING: 00 1B 90 67 B7 C0 
 q-r20 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.36 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 FC 51 40
 q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.33 = Hex-STRING: 00 12 D9 18 66 C0 
 q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.34 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 C3 82 35 C0 
 q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.35 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 B3 76 40 
 q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.36 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 FC 51 40 

Desired Result.

 q-r20 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.31 = Hex-STRING: 00 1B 90 67 B7 C0 
 q-r20 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.36 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 FC 51 40 
 q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.33 = Hex-STRING: 00 12 D9 18 66 C0 
 q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.34 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 C3 82 35 C0 
 q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.36 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 FC 51 40
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Is your desired result correct? Wouldn't you want to keep the "35" row? –  glenn jackman Apr 30 '13 at 14:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Set FS to : makes this simple, the fourth column is the MAC address using this FS:

$ awk -F':' '{print $4}' file
 00 1B 90 67 B7 C0 
 00 13 60 FC 51 40
 00 12 D9 18 66 C0 
 00 13 C3 82 35 C0 
 00 13 60 B3 76 40 
 00 13 60 FC 51 40 

Just edit your script to deal with $4 for the unique values:

$ awk -F':' '!a[$4]++' file
 q-r20 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.31 = Hex-STRING: 00 1B 90 67 B7 C0
 q-r20 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.36 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 FC 51 40
 q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.33 = Hex-STRING: 00 12 D9 18 66 C0
 q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.34 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 C3 82 35 C0
 q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.35 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 B3 76 40
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1  
+1, but you have to be careful that the data does not contain inconsistent whitespace at the end of the line (which is the case for the input data in the question) –  glenn jackman Apr 30 '13 at 15:03

Perl solution:

perl -F: -ane 'print unless $seen{$F[3]}++'
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For an awk solution, you just need to define an appropriate array key

awk '{key=$(NF-5) $(NF-4) $(NF-3) $(NF-2) $(NF-1) $NF} !x[key]++' file
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+1 for handling any potential whitespace issue. –  iiSeymour Apr 30 '13 at 15:35

It has a sorted (by MAC address) output

sort -ut: -k4<<EOT
q-r20 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.31 = Hex-STRING: 00 1B 90 67 B7 C0 
q-r20 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.36 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 FC 51 40
q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.33 = Hex-STRING: 00 12 D9 18 66 C0 
q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.34 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 C3 82 35 C0 
q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.35 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 B3 76 40 
q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.36 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 FC 51 40
EOT

Output

q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.33 = Hex-STRING: 00 12 D9 18 66 C0 
q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.35 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 B3 76 40 
q-r20 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.36 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 FC 51 40
q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.34 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 C3 82 35 C0 
q-r20 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.31 = Hex-STRING: 00 1B 90 67 B7 C0

Or you can get an IP address sorted output using

sort -ut: -k4<<EOT|sort -t: -k3
q-r20 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.31 = Hex-STRING: 00 1B 90 67 B7 C0 
q-r20 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.36 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 FC 51 40
q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.33 = Hex-STRING: 00 12 D9 18 66 C0 
q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.34 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 C3 82 35 C0 
q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.35 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 B3 76 40 
q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.36 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 FC 51 40
EOT

Output:

q-r20 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.31 = Hex-STRING: 00 1B 90 67 B7 C0 
q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.33 = Hex-STRING: 00 12 D9 18 66 C0 
q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.34 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 C3 82 35 C0 
q-r21 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.35 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 B3 76 40 
q-r20 RFC1213-MIB::atPhysAddress.1.1.10.6.2.36 = Hex-STRING: 00 13 60 FC 51 40
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