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I'm still not practiced in oop.. now I know the importantness of it :)

I have many methods and now I like to save collected strings in public variables to have the possiblity to access them from another function.

normaly I would make just public or private variables with get and set.

But this I think it's not so clean because this propertys are in "every intellisense" visible.

I think to do this into a class may be "testClass" and define the properties there.

But now, how I access to the values which I have written into the propertys of this class? To write them in I have to create a new instance of the class, but how access to the created instance?

// edit

    protected void GetValues()
{
    // Access to the public variable town.

    string myNewtown = publictown;
    string myNewName = publicname;

    // How to acces to the values which I saved in the class informations? 
    // I like anything like that
    string myNewtown = informations.publictown;
    string myNewName = informations.publicname;

    // or

    string myNewtown = myinfo.publictown;
    string myNewName = myinfo.publicname;

}

protected void Setvalues()
{
    informations myinfo = new informations()
    {
        publicname = "leo",
        publictown = "london"
    };
}

private string publicname { get; set; }
private string publictown { get; set; }

private class informations
{
    public string publicname { get; set; }
    public string publictown { get; set; }
}

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Could you post a bit of your code and comment it? I'm sorry but I don't get what you are trying to achieve. –  Philippe Oct 27 '09 at 10:27
    
i edited hope you understand –  Jack Black Oct 27 '09 at 10:55
    
Should publicname and publictown be global (a) to the complete application, (b) to the current session or (c) to just the one ASP.NET request you are currently handling? –  Heinzi Oct 27 '09 at 11:29
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want your properties to be accessible without creating an instance, use the static keyword.

EDIT: In your example, you would replace

public string publicname { get; set; }

with

public static string publicname { get; set; }

which allows you to read the field as

string myNewname = informations.publicname;

and set it with

informations.publicname = "whatever";

Of course, this means that you can only have one instance of publicname in your application -- in particular, in an ASP.NET application, this might not be what you want!

share|improve this answer
    
thank you guys. thats what I want! –  Jack Black Oct 27 '09 at 12:37
    
so nice! you make me happy. this is the cleanest way to develop, isn't it?.... why is this "static" not default set for properties, it's more useful..? –  Jack Black Oct 27 '09 at 13:16
1  
properties and methods marked as static are common for all objects using them. So they are similar to global variables, making them a problem from a position of testability, debugging, parallel access from multiple threads etc. They need to be used sparingly. –  elder_george Oct 27 '09 at 13:24
1  
Well, the whole point of object-orientation is about creating objects. With "static", you avoid creating objects but rather have something like a "global variable". I cannot explain OO programming to you in a 500 character comment, so I really advise you to get some web tutorial or good book on this topic and start with a bit of theory. –  Heinzi Oct 27 '09 at 13:24
    
Thanks, I do!... Problem is no time for books ... but I have to. –  Jack Black Oct 27 '09 at 13:35
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If you want access a created object, you need to store reference to it after creating.

Having look at your sample, I can offer you following change:

protected void GetValues()
{
// Access to the public variable town.

    string myNewtown = publictown;
    string myNewName = publicname;

// or

    string myNewtown = myinfo.publictown;
    string myNewName = myinfo.publicname;
}

protected void Setvalues()
{
    publicname = "leo";
    publictown = "london";
}

// we store reference to internal object
informations myinfo = new informations();
// and delegate property access to its properties.
public string publicname 
{ 
    get{ return informations.publicname;} 
    set{ informations.publicname = value; } 
}
public string publictown 
{ 
    get{ return informations.publictown;} 
    set{ informations.publictown = value; } 
}


private class informations
{
    public string publicname { get; set; }
    public string publictown { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
i edited hope you understand –  Jack Black Oct 27 '09 at 10:59
    
also thanks to you.. really nice! By the way is this the cleanest way? or can I develop it as more clena :)? –  Jack Black Oct 27 '09 at 12:38
1  
OO design is generally about moving operations and data together. So consider moving logic currently using publicname and publictown into your information class. It's hard to say more without knowing task at hand, of course. –  elder_george Oct 27 '09 at 13:20
    
thank you. is this method better or the other with "static" –  Jack Black Oct 27 '09 at 14:22
    
I usually avoid static state in my programs, since I've found them to become a PITA very quickly (I've listed problems in comments to other answer) - and they aren't object oriented enough for me =). But for a (very) simple program static properties may be not so harmful. Just think about it in context of your task: could differents parts of your program need different values for publictown and publicname? If yes, than statics don't fit. If no, you may use them, but be careful. –  elder_george Oct 27 '09 at 17:06
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