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I need to do this , check for an import of java.sql.PreparedStatement , i have the parsing tree that contains the import statements on that list and i want to check it , the code alredy works , but it looks like it's not the best it could be , is there a better way to check this list?

List<DetailAST> packageDefinition = findAllAstsOfType(aAST, TokenTypes.IDENT);
        for (int j = 0; j < packageDefinition.size() - 2; j++) {
            if (packageDefinition.get(j).getText().equals("java")) {
                if (packageDefinition.get(j + 1).getText().equals("sql")) {
                    if (packageDefinition.get(j + 2).getText().equals("PreparedStatement")) {
                        importsPreparedStatement = true;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
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4  
One thing you could do is to add a break; statement after your importsPreparedStatement = true;. – maba Apr 30 '13 at 11:44
    
Like maba said, you can put a break; statement after importsPreparedStatement = true;. In addition, I guess you potentially have many java.sql. imports so it can be a minor improvement to check (j+2) part of the definition first. This could decrease the number of comparisons you may make. – temelm Apr 30 '13 at 11:53
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Apart from combining your 3 ifs to one:

if(statement1 && statement2 && statement3)

there are some other ideas which came into mind:

If the importsPreparedStatement only has to be true once then you can break; after setting it to true. So if there is no point in searching anymore after you set the field to true use break;.

From a design perspective you may combine your ifs into a method like doesImportPreparedStatement or isImportingPreparedStatement, or maybe containsImportPreparedStatement.

I see one more thing. You are iterating over your packageDefinition but you are checking 3 elements after each other. I assume that they are grouped in groups of 3 so you may do something like this:

for (int j = 0; j < packageDefinition.size() - 2; j += 3)

From a design perspective if I were you I would put those 3 elements into their own class and in that case you can simplify things and it would look like:

for(DefinitionElement e : packageDefinitions) {
    if(e.doesImportPreparedStatement()) {
        importsPreparedStatement = true;
        break;
    }
}

In the latter case the type DefinitionElement will contain the 3 elements you group together in your array and a method which can tell whether it contains prepared statement imports or not. I think this form is more readable and easier to maintain. From my experience calculating with indexes is not fun and you have to understand the context in order to know what j + 2 means.

If you don't want (or can't) move them to their own class you can at least give a name to the index j + 2 and j + 1 so you will later know what do they mean.

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thanks , i'm refactoring the code right now :) – Lucas Moreira Apr 30 '13 at 11:53
    
I think moving your group of elements to their own class is the preferable way. – Adam Arold Apr 30 '13 at 11:57

I don't really understand your DetailAST class and how you have inserted the differenct objects into the list but at least you can use && instead of nested if statements.

List<DetailAST> packageDefinition = findAllAstsOfType(aAST, TokenTypes.IDENT);
for (int j = 0; j < packageDefinition.size() - 2; j++) {
    if (packageDefinition.get(j).getText().equals("java") &&
        packageDefinition.get(j + 1).getText().equals("sql") &&
        packageDefinition.get(j + 2).getText().equals("PreparedStatement")) {
        importsPreparedStatement = true;
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
DetailAst is a parsing tree node for the code , it contains a token with a type and his siblings and sons , in this case i'm looking for import statements and checking the IDENT nodes that folow , which form the name of the package to be imported, it's a checkstyle class and i'm not fully aware of it's features, i just have a lot of reference code from the codebase. – Lucas Moreira Apr 30 '13 at 11:59

Use && operator to make it as one condition. Like :

if ((packageDefinition.get(j).getText().equals("java"))    && 
    (packageDefinition.get(j + 1).getText().equals("sql")) &&
    (packageDefinition.get(j + 2).getText().equals("PreparedStatement"))) 
{
     importsPreparedStatement = true;
}

Because Java's && operator does short-circuit.

For example, when (packageDefinition.get(j).getText().equals("java")) evaluated as false. The other two won't be evaluated simply because it wouldn't be necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the tip , i'm quite new to java and that was a nice insight on the working of the operator , i was not sure if i could do that without having to evaluate all the conditions everytime. – Lucas Moreira Apr 30 '13 at 12:02

You can try this solution, which finds an array inside a larger array:

public static int findArray(Integer[] array, Integer[] subArray)
{
    if (Collections.indexOfSubList(Arrays.asList(array), Arrays.asList(subArray)) != null)
    {
        importsPreparedStatement = true;
    {
}

Just make subArray[] = {"java,"sql",PreparedStatement"};

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